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Students who lost their chance to participate in a winter or spring sport or an extra-curricular activitiy as the result of the coronavirus can recoup the missed opportunity thanks to a stroke of Gov. Phil Murphy’s pen Friday.

The so called “bridge year” legislation, senate bill 2383, introduced by Sen. Paul A. Sarlo (D-Bergen and Passaic), is open to high school seniors in the graduating classes of 2021 and 2022.

The law requires the Commissioner of Education to establish a three-year program that would allow some seniors to receive an additional spring season.

The law allows this year’s high school sophomores and juniors - after graduation - to return to their high school to participate in spring extracurricular activities, including interscholastic sports. To take advantage of this so-called “bridge year” students would have to be enrolled as non-matriculated students and taking classes at a New Jersey county community college.

Source: https://www.nj.com/highschools...signed-into-law.html

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Sen. Paul A. Sarlo has a son who was a 2022 and is now a 2023 thanks to this legislation that was passed. At first, I didn't think anyone else would do it. Who wants to be the freshman in college who is playing High School baseball? But, now I heard of another kid who was a 2022 but is now calling himself a 2023 because he's planning on attending community college and playing a 5th year of HS baseball.

I guess this is really a thing now?

@Francis7 posted:

Sen. Paul A. Sarlo has a son who was a 2022 and is now a 2023 thanks to this legislation that was passed. At first, I didn't think anyone else would do it. Who wants to be the freshman in college who is playing High School baseball? But, now I heard of another kid who was a 2022 but is now calling himself a 2023 because he's planning on attending community college and playing a 5th year of HS baseball.

I guess this is really a thing now?

Back in the days we would call these kids ringers.

Back in the days we would call these kids ringers.

Talked to some others today and they've heard of other kids exercising this option now. I totally misjudged this one. I never thought that a kid would want to attend college and play HS baseball while in college. I guess I totally underestimated people's heads and hearts on this one.

That said, as usual, it doesn't apply to those who excel and don't need something like this to keep playing or attempt to improve their ability to compete.

Maybe it's different in New Jersey, but taking a couple of classes at a local community college is nothing like "attending college".  I would bet most of those kids will take online courses and never leave their parents house or the college courses will be offered on the HS campus.

Here the lines are pretty blurred, our high school has a whole section of courses offered in conjunction with the local community college where kids take college courses on the HS campus and get duel credit for both HS and college while still in HS.

Last edited by 22and25
@22and25 posted:

Maybe it's different in New Jersey, but taking a couple of classes at a local community college is nothing like "attending college".  I would bet most of those kids will take online courses and never leave their parents house or the college courses will be offered on the HS campus.

Here the lines are pretty blurred, our high school has a whole section of courses offered in conjunction with the local community college where kids take college courses on the HS campus and get duel credit for both HS and college while still in HS.

NJ has the same arrangement with respects to HS students taking college course and receiving dual credits.

Upon thinking more about @francis7 post, one can look at this many ways.

E.G. Player graduated in 2019, due to cancellation of 2019 spring season,  no musical chair available.

With the uncertainty of COVID-19, he decided to stay local until 2021 - 2022.   The local community college is loaded (most players are staying, because they didn't get offers at 4yr schools).

So, family doesn't want to stop the academics, but the player still wants to play.  If he sits out another year of competitive Baseball and have to wait until summer 2021 to get on the diamond, he will be even further behind.

So play 5th year of HS.   IMHO, is this any different than a player doing an extra year at a Prep school in order to work on his grades?

This happens more than we think.

Last edited by CollegebaseballInsights

This reminds me of when Legion ball where it was relevant raised the participation age to 19. The 19yos who were real players moved on to college summer ball. The competent, yet not good enough to play college ball kids played Legion at 19.

The NJ rule won’t have studs sticking around to play high school ball. It will keep some competent hangers on in the game an additional year. Good high school players won’t be affected.

Last edited by RJM
@RJM posted:

I could see staying in the game with summer ball. But I can’t imagine going back to high school just for baseball and hanging with high school kids.

That was my take. But, apparently people are doing it. Now, add that some kids already reclassified before this happened. Potentially you could have a 21 year old playing HS baseball with this loophole.

“That’s what I love about these high school girls, man. I get older, they stay the same age.”  – David Wooderson

We arrived at Aberdeen for a 16u tournament way too early one weekend. My son asked why we were watching a 10u game. Without blinking I responded, “10u mothers.”

I remember the first time I noticed one of my basketball players as a young woman. I thought, “Wow, she got hot looking. Now remember she’s just a basketball player.”

It wasn’t a matter of looking at her in a weird manner. It was a matter of just don’t look, period other than to coach.

@RJM posted:

We arrived at Aberdeen for a 16u tournament way too early one weekend. My son asked why we were watching a 10u game. Without blinking I responded, “10u mothers.”

I remember the first time I noticed one of my basketball players as a young woman. I thought, “Wow, she got hot looking. Now remember she’s just a basketball player.”

It wasn’t a matter of looking at her in a weird manner. It was a matter of just don’t look, period other than to coach.

“That’s what I love about these high school girls, man. I get older, they stay the same age.”  – David Wooderson

So the kid was playing TBB in grade school. We spent a lot of time playing tournaments at this facility in Bloomington. So we get there one Saturday and like always I start walking around watching some B'ball. I came upon a court and was like OMG. There was this young woman just putting on a show. God she was beautiful. Tall, blonde, tan, athletic. I watched her for a while, then I noticed some of the other girls weren't very big. I guess seeing her first I assumed it was at least a HS age group. So I went and found the board and looked up court and time. Nope, not HS, 7th grade. I felt pretty bad. I mean I never got to the point where I was like "man I'd hit that". Or if I did I've repressed that memory.  In my defense that girl could have walked into any bar or frat party and no one would have given it a second thought. Her dad must have been a basket case by the time she turned 18.

Last edited by SomeBaseballDad
@K9 posted:

I've heard of a few kids who will be taking this opportunity, as mentioned they don't appear to be top prospects.  Have also heard of at least one coach who told kids he didn't want any 5th year seniors.

I could see that - especially since that 5th year senior might not be an impact player...or else he would be playing in college somewhere. A lot of coaches in HS don't need old bench players. Leads to a lot of complaining and having to deal with it.

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