Been having a debate about this for a while with my dad, as I have now been in the habit of having a one-handed follow through. What is your opinion on the follow through after you swing? Should you have 2 hands on the bat? Does it help you hit the ball harder? Or is it okay to have a one-handed follow through?

Original Post

I'll be curious to hear other responses.   The top hand is a big part of the equation.  In order to maximize bat speed and power, it must be fully engaged through the contact zone.  For most, a good gage to measure that is where the top hand ends up at the finish of the swing.  If it ends up at least up near the shoulder of the bottom hand,  then top hand release was not too early.  If it ends up low and across the mid-section, this is often an indication that release was early and the hitter didn't stay connected long enough.   

Beyond that, it comes down to preference, swing type, flexibility and second half extension.  Some keep both hands on, some release the top hand.  Also, it is often a result of pitch location. 

Often, when I am working with some of our hitters in the cage, I will ask that they keep both hands on the bat.  This may be because I am seeing early release or because I am seeing the swing get long too early or pulling off the ball early or it is a balance issue.  Once the issue is resolved,  I am OK with them going back to top hand release, as long as it isn't early and doesn't cause re-introduction of the initially perceived problem.

I'm just a dad and former Little League coach, not a HS coach like Cabbage, so take my opinion with a large dose of salt.  8 of the most successful teams in MLB are playing right now. Why not watch those guys and see how  many finish their swing with one hand on the bat?  I'm thinking you'll see that the great majority finish with 2 hands on. Of those few that take the top hand off, I think you'll see that it stays on at least until they extend through the ball -- IOW keep the top hand on past the point where the end of the bat is facing the pitcher.

cabbagedad posted:

I'll be curious to hear other responses.   The top hand is a big part of the equation.  In order to maximize bat speed and power, it must be fully engaged through the contact zone.  For most, a good gage to measure that is where the top hand ends up at the finish of the swing.  If it ends up at least up near the shoulder of the bottom hand,  then top hand release was not too early.  If it ends up low and across the mid-section, this is often an indication that release was early and the hitter didn't stay connected long enough.   

Beyond that, it comes down to preference, swing type, flexibility and second half extension.  Some keep both hands on, some release the top hand.  Also, it is often a result of pitch location. 

Often, when I am working with some of our hitters in the cage, I will ask that they keep both hands on the bat.  This may be because I am seeing early release or because I am seeing the swing get long too early or pulling off the ball early or it is a balance issue.  Once the issue is resolved,  I am OK with them going back to top hand release, as long as it isn't early and doesn't cause re-introduction of the initially perceived problem.

I agree with the variables as to why the top hand could come off. I want to keep 2 hands on the bat, but the one handed follow through just happens. 

JCG posted:

I'm just a dad and former Little League coach, not a HS coach like Cabbage, so take my opinion with a large dose of salt.  8 of the most successful teams in MLB are playing right now. Why not watch those guys and see how  many finish their swing with one hand on the bat?  I'm thinking you'll see that the great majority finish with 2 hands on. Of those few that take the top hand off, I think you'll see that it stays on at least until they extend through the ball -- IOW keep the top hand on past the point where the end of the bat is facing the pitcher.

I want to have a 2 handed follow through, just something I will work on. Got a tournament this weekend.  Will try to get video then. 

Wesleythecacther posted:

 Been having a debate about this for a while with my dad, as I have now been in the habit of having a one-handed follow through. What is your opinion on the follow through after you swing? Should you have 2 hands on the bat? Does it help you hit the ball harder? Or is it okay to have a one-handed follow through?

read this article 

https://baseballrebellion.com/...ith-one-hand-or-two/

 

both can work buy don't release before you finish the turn (back shoulder points to the pitcher).

Doesn't matter after contact. Can be either way if it helps you to square it up and hit as hard as you can. You may roll over on the ball or popup if you are trying to acheive an arbitrary post contact position such as 2 hands on the bat or being balanced AFTER contact. Once the ball leaves the bat there is NOTHING more you can do to effect the outcome. So 1 or 2 hands AFTER contact is irrelevant.

2019&21 Dad posted:

Doesn't matter after contact. Can be either way if it helps you to square it up and hit as hard as you can. You may roll over on the ball or popup if you are trying to acheive an arbitrary post contact position such as 2 hands on the bat or being balanced AFTER contact. Once the ball leaves the bat there is NOTHING more you can do to effect the outcome. So 1 or 2 hands AFTER contact is irrelevant.

It's irrelevant right up to the point you hit my kid (the catcher) in the back of the head with your one hand release swing.

CaCO3Girl posted:
2019&21 Dad posted:

Doesn't matter after contact. Can be either way if it helps you to square it up and hit as hard as you can. You may roll over on the ball or popup if you are trying to acheive an arbitrary post contact position such as 2 hands on the bat or being balanced AFTER contact. Once the ball leaves the bat there is NOTHING more you can do to effect the outcome. So 1 or 2 hands AFTER contact is irrelevant.

It's irrelevant right up to the point you hit my kid (the catcher) in the back of the head with your one hand release swing.

Still irrelevant. Wouldn't make me change how I hit. Apparently not a concern for so many others who do it too.

the most meaningless discussion in baseball...it doesn't matter if you release the bat properly.

I have one who finishes with one hand and one who finishes with 2. There are mountains of videos showing awesome swings from both sides of the plate with both forms of release. nothing to see here folks.

2019&21 Dad posted:
CaCO3Girl posted:
2019&21 Dad posted:

Doesn't matter after contact. Can be either way if it helps you to square it up and hit as hard as you can. You may roll over on the ball or popup if you are trying to acheive an arbitrary post contact position such as 2 hands on the bat or being balanced AFTER contact. Once the ball leaves the bat there is NOTHING more you can do to effect the outcome. So 1 or 2 hands AFTER contact is irrelevant.

It's irrelevant right up to the point you hit my kid (the catcher) in the back of the head with your one hand release swing.

Still irrelevant. Wouldn't make me change how I hit. Apparently not a concern for so many others who do it too.

it sucks to be hit by a backswing but a catcher Needs to be Aware of that and set up properly.

maybe that is even a slight Advantage of the one handed finish.

My son is a catcher. It DOES such to be hit by a one-handed backswing. Especially by the same kid in back to back ABs. Fortunately, he wears a hockey style helmet and that's the only time he's ever been hit by a back swing. DOMINIK85: are you implying that potentially hitting a catcher with a backswing is a good thing (somehow)?

Once contact has been made the only thing that matters is get out of the box and start running.  One hand or two hands don't matter.  I like what Cabbage said about where top hand ends up and switching to two hands for drill purposes.  But once the ball is hit the swing is over and now you transition to running.

If a catcher gets hit then it's the catcher's fault for being too close.  I learned that back in the day when my throwing elbow got drilled by a bat on a follow through.

coach2709 posted:

Once contact has been made the only thing that matters is get out of the box and start running.  One hand or two hands don't matter.  I like what Cabbage said about where top hand ends up and switching to two hands for drill purposes.  But once the ball is hit the swing is over and now you transition to running.

If a catcher gets hit then it's the catcher's fault for being too close.  I learned that back in the day when my throwing elbow got drilled by a bat on a follow through.

As a catcher I don't care, it's a risk that I take. As a rule of thumb i will take my glove hand it fits a Righ handed batter and make sure my glove is 2 inches or so from his leg, then I should be good. But sometimes it just happens and I get hit. Doesn't matter, just shake it off and act like it doesn't happen, shows how tough you are anyways. 

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