Our son, RHP, had labrum surgery Nov. 23. Doc was very pleased with results. On top of labrum was a very clean tear with some fraying on the front and back side. There is a buffer, if you will, at the top of the labrum but his was rolled back. He used 1 anchor to form that buffer again with the capsule and 3 other anchors were used to complete the job. His rotator cuff was very healthy along with his capsule. Doc gave him a very good prognosis. Here's praying for a healthy recovery and positive outcomes. Anyone who has gone through this are welcome to enlighten us with their journey. 

Thanks 

Original Post

Hey Hunter, hope things turn out well.  There have been lots of threads on labrum injuries you can search on HSBBW.  There seems to be several varieties and severity levels.  We have dealt with multiple versions just with our HS program the last few years.  Results of surgery vary.  One constant seems to be the importance of following PT to the letter and not rushing back for best results.  

My son is a 2018 infielder who tore the labrum in his non-throwing shoulder on a diving play in August.  No surgery needed but he is out until January just to play it safe and get through PT.  He missed all of Fall but should be back to 100% soon.  Just showing that even without surgery PT is extremely important and he will be out a total of 4 months.

Take your time, and best of luck!

Update on Labrum. Son is 11 months post surgery and yesterday he threw to live hitters. He says arm feels great and very strong. He followed his rehab religiously and never had any setbacks. He is still following his throwing program but should be completed in the next 2 weeks. Thereafter he will take a 3 week break and should be ready to roll this winter and prepare for his spring season. His perseverance and hard work is paying off  but knows there is still work ahead. We are exciting to see how things go in the spring. Blessed

9and7dad posted:

That's great news Hunter.  If you don't mind, what were the symptoms leading to the diagnosis and ultimately surgery?  Was it general shoulder soreness or was there an event that specifically caused the issue? 

He had continued bicep tendonitis which started his junior year of HS. He would rehab for a few weeks and 6 months later the tendonitis would return. Each time we had MRI's done but nothing conclusive. His freshman year in college the tendinitis reoccurred so back to rehab. He returned back to the mound 6 weeks later and after his 1st outing from rehab it occurred again. He came home after freshman year and rehabbed all summer with his PT that he had used in HS. He relocated to a local JUCO and played in the fall. His velo was down and he was having more issues so we went to our Ortho and he passed all his strength test and Doc was going to recommend rehab again but I insisted on an MRI. Finally they saw the tear which they diagnosed as a SLAP Tear. He had surgery 2 weeks later with 4 anchors put in place. Ultimately the bicep tendonitis was the culprit and we never knew. As his HS seasons were getting to the playoffs we noticed his command was not as good but his velo started creeping down as well. We did all the right things but the test were just too inconclusive. He's doing well and is looking forward to the spring. Will keep everyone posted. Thank You, 

My son had surgery this Tuesday for a SLAP tear in his Labrum and a torn rotator cuff.  His Dr. told us he sees a 50% re-occurrence of the injury in athletes.  He's a catcher, 25 years old and just finished his fourth year of pro ball.  The Dr. said his tendons looked like those of a much older man (not an old man but one much older than 25).  It's too soon for him to start rehab but it's supposed to be 5-6 months to full use of his arm.  Down the road he may face the need to reattach the biceps which would alter his throwing motion.  He always took care of his arm, but once he left college he found himself catching 80-85 games a season with one day off a week.

can-o-corn posted:

My son had surgery this Tuesday for a SLAP tear in his Labrum and a torn rotator cuff.  His Dr. told us he sees a 50% re-occurrence of the injury in athletes.  He's a catcher, 25 years old and just finished his fourth year of pro ball.  The Dr. said his tendons looked like those of a much older man (not an old man but one much older than 25).  It's too soon for him to start rehab but it's supposed to be 5-6 months to full use of his arm.  Down the road he may face the need to reattach the biceps which would alter his throwing motion.  He always took care of his arm, but once he left college he found himself catching 80-85 games a season with one day off a week.

Sorry to hear that Can!

After throwing to live hitters at practice the past few weeks son gets the nod to start his 1st game on Saturday. He will be allowed to throw 1 inning. He's pretty pumped as he's 11 and a half months post surgery. He says his arm feels great and just excited to get on the mound in live action. Will update after his outing, Excited for him.

His outing went well. faced 4 hitters, walked 1st one then picked him at 1st base. Allowed 1 hit and no runs. Arm felt very strong and his trainer said he look good with smooth mechanics and no signs of stress. His velo was 83-84 less than 12 months post surgery. Most importantly was there was no discomfort and he seemed to compete well. A great 1st step to his comeback. Very excited for him. 

can-o-corn posted:

My son had surgery this Tuesday for a SLAP tear in his Labrum and a torn rotator cuff.  His Dr. told us he sees a 50% re-occurrence of the injury in athletes.  He's a catcher, 25 years old and just finished his fourth year of pro ball.  The Dr. said his tendons looked like those of a much older man (not an old man but one much older than 25).  It's too soon for him to start rehab but it's supposed to be 5-6 months to full use of his arm.  Down the road he may face the need to reattach the biceps which would alter his throwing motion.  He always took care of his arm, but once he left college he found himself catching 80-85 games a season with one day off a week.

Can-o-corn

 My son (19) had surgery this past Wednesday. What appeared to be a large labrum/SLAP tear ended up being a SLAP III tear with bucket handle and a full thickness rotator cuff tear. He is a catcher. My son had a amazing 1st season (JUCO), leading the nation (in JUCO ball) in homeruns...was likely being drafted next month, had everything worked out with the team...until his shoulder finally gave out. Can I ask how your sons recovery went? Any advice?

BBcatch posted:
can-o-corn posted:

My son had surgery this Tuesday for a SLAP tear in his Labrum and a torn rotator cuff.  His Dr. told us he sees a 50% re-occurrence of the injury in athletes.  He's a catcher, 25 years old and just finished his fourth year of pro ball.  The Dr. said his tendons looked like those of a much older man (not an old man but one much older than 25).  It's too soon for him to start rehab but it's supposed to be 5-6 months to full use of his arm.  Down the road he may face the need to reattach the biceps which would alter his throwing motion.  He always took care of his arm, but once he left college he found himself catching 80-85 games a season with one day off a week.

Can-o-corn

 My son (19) had surgery this past Wednesday. What appeared to be a large labrum/SLAP tear ended up being a SLAP III tear with bucket handle and a full thickness rotator cuff tear. He is a catcher. My son had a amazing 1st season (JUCO), leading the nation (in JUCO ball) in homeruns...was likely being drafted next month, had everything worked out with the team...until his shoulder finally gave out. Can I ask how your sons recovery went? Any advice?

Can-o-Corn

He will need to be patient with his recovery, work the process, it will be gradual.   Try to refrain from giving him opoids. 

I understand the danger of opioids...I am a parole officer- lol. Doc gave him 10, 5mg roxicodone (oxycodone w/o the tylenol) which he was told to use sparingly as he would not get more. Suggested he save some for PT. He got a nerve block prior to surgery which was to last 3-5 days, meaning it should be wearing off soon. Thanks for the advice.

BBcatch posted:

I understand the danger of opioids...I am a parole officer- lol. Doc gave him 10, 5mg roxicodone (oxycodone w/o the tylenol) which he was told to use sparingly as he would not get more. Suggested he save some for PT. He got a nerve block prior to surgery which was to last 3-5 days, meaning it should be wearing off soon. Thanks for the advice.

Yeah,  my son (pitcher) was had a SLAP tear before his spring season. Found out another player similar injury in the fall of 2014.  They wanted him to take a cortisone shot, fortunately I pull the plug and took him to the doctor to review the issue.  Interesting as he was going for his surgery, we saw a couple of the players that he played high school against having similar surgeries.   Which was a deeper issue as to what the heck is going on with the training at the college level. Long story, he had his surgery in summer 2015, had a perscription of 50, plus another 75.  We used the 50 as perscribed, but I believe even that was too much.  Make sure you get the cryo-cuff to help the burn.

 

He had to get a second surgery to remove some scar tissue,  no opoids, something lighter and let him deal with the pain.

Good luck on your son recovery.  Tell him, to go through the process, he is no alone.  If you or your son knows a previous player the surgeon had operated on, you can connect with him for post surgery advice.  Your son is going to need a support group.

 

Good luck.

BBcatch posted:

The school trainer mentioned going home with something akin to the cryo cuff but surgeon said he did not feel he needed it. Matter of fact he was pretty ticked off that trainer even mentioned it. Probably would be great once PT starts.

Our Surgeon was Dr. Craig Morgan in Delaware, he did Kurt Schilling's shoulder.  IMHO, ask some parents/players who have gone through this process  for their feedback. Weight the results and move forward.   

 

Good luck.

BBCatch

The surgery went fine and the rehab was long and arduous.  His surgery was in Oct of 2017 and it was a full year at least to start to get back to where he was.  There is no way he could have played in 2018.  Maybe, and I say maybe he could have come back in 2019.   Being an athlete he worked hard at rehab, and once released continued to work at it (rehabbing exercises) while he worked out.  He made the decision to retire after the surgery, he was 25, in love and ready to start a life outside of baseball.  I don't know if he could have continued to play, he's still getting calls from high level independent league teams checking to see if he'd like to play again but he's comfortable in his decision.  The one thing that he said really hasn't come back is over head strength, like putting up a ladder or chopping wood.

So where is he now?  He's 27, engaged, he's working in a management program for a fortune 500 company, he has a dog and can actually go to the beach or out with friends, something he hadn't been able to do since he was 9.  He still loves baseball and doesn't regret for a minute all he gave it or all it has given to him.  He's in his second year coaching youth travel teams for a large national championship level organization.

Advice, follow the doctors orders, take a red shirt year, be patient.  When he does start playing again be aware he will not be at the level he is now, it might take a year or two to get it back.  Work on his grades, prepare for life after baseball.

 

I wish your son the best.  He's got youth on his side, he can afford to miss a year or two and still have a great career in baseball.  Just don't hurry him back.  If you want I can put him or you in touch with my son and he can discuss his experiences with the surgery and rehab.

can-o-corn posted:

BBCatch

The surgery went fine and the rehab was long and arduous.  His surgery was in Oct of 2017 and it was a full year at least to start to get back to where he was.  There is no way he could have played in 2018.  Maybe, and I say maybe he could have come back in 2019.   Being an athlete he worked hard at rehab, and once released continued to work at it (rehabbing exercises) while he worked out.  He made the decision to retire after the surgery, he was 25, in love and ready to start a life outside of baseball.  I don't know if he could have continued to play, he's still getting calls from high level independent league teams checking to see if he'd like to play again but he's comfortable in his decision.  The one thing that he said really hasn't come back is over head strength, like putting up a ladder or chopping wood.

So where is he now?  He's 27, engaged, he's working in a management program for a fortune 500 company, he has a dog and can actually go to the beach or out with friends, something he hadn't been able to do since he was 9.  He still loves baseball and doesn't regret for a minute all he gave it or all it has given to him.  He's in his second year coaching youth travel teams for a large national championship level organization.

Advice, follow the doctors orders, take a red shirt year, be patient.  When he does start playing again be aware he will not be at the level he is now, it might take a year or two to get it back.  Work on his grades, prepare for life after baseball.

 

I wish your son the best.  He's got youth on his side, he can afford to miss a year or two and still have a great career in baseball.  Just don't hurry him back.  If you want I can put him or you in touch with my son and he can discuss his experiences with the surgery and rehab.

Spot on.   He tried to rush back after his 2nd surgery in Dec 2016. His  Juco team was very good, lost to Parkland in the 2017 finals.  He was throwing hard but could not locate.  He lacked the patience to work the process.

Sounds like your son made the best of his situation. Leaving something that had been a significant part of his life since a young age has got to have been heartwrenching. I already see the disappointment in my son's eyes as he attends the games of his peers. But, we are trying to remind him that the surgeon appeared confident and that hopefully in time he will be able to return, perhaps not as a catcher, but still as a ball player. I think what gets him the most was that he went into surgery with a torn labrum, only to find out later that he had not only the Slap III tear but also a full thickness rotator cuff tear. The first words out of his mouth was ,"I'm f*****" of course we have reminded him that he has several years of baseball left...we encourage him to focus on college...but at 19, so close to the draft, all he can think of is baseball. He honestly was never much of a scholar, focused more on his friends, his social life and baseball...more baseball...actually ice hockey was his passion for a good portion of his youth, until a lengthy struggle with post- concussion ended that dream, but by than he was already eating, sleeping and breathing baseball. One day this will be behind him...meanwhile I have faith that be will work hard to achieve his goal. Your son sounds like a great young man, thank you for sharing his story, it is inspiring!

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