Hey All,

A week ago my team was doing Pocket Radar readings during practice. I started with a running crow hop and was sitting 75-77. After 3 throws my coach had us run up and spin glove side 360 degrees before throwing. The next three throws were 82-83 MPH. Mechanically, what is going on different by spinning? How can I apply this to my pitching motion?

Original Post

Your whole body was behind the throw, especially your lower half. Sounds like a good pitching drill. 

Caveat, not a coach...

Sounds like if you made that part of your pregame drills, and your bullpen sessions, not necessarily modify your motion, it would help with the whole body moving the ball to the plate. 

Talk to your coach

MB2017 posted:

Hey All,

A week ago my team was doing Pocket Radar readings during practice. I started with a running crow hop and was sitting 75-77. After 3 throws my coach had us run up and spin glove side 360 degrees before throwing. The next three throws were 82-83 MPH. Mechanically, what is going on different by spinning? How can I apply this to my pitching motion?

Very interesting.  Did the coach mention anything about why the spin was being done or did he just tell everyone to spin?  Mechanically I would assume you simply got more/faster rotation (since you were spinning) of all parts including hips and shoulders.  You can probably take away some concepts from the drill and apply to pitching (maximize rotation in sequence), but probably not actual mechanics (no spinning allowed on the mound).

I am still learning about pitching, but have found that high-speed stop motion photos can help illustrate certain motions better than perhaps slow-motion video.  The sequence can highlight hip rotation and shoulder roation while getting a good idea how this occurs in relation to the overall pitch motion.  Chris O'leary seems to have some good photo sequences for both pitching and hitting.

One, your rotational velocity created a vector before the ball is thrown, the throw velocity is added to the vector you created.  Two, you are mechanically creating more mechanical load as well.  If you are ever being gunned for throws, try to create an initial vector.  Do not throw flat footed.  Your body should be in motion towards the radar gun before and after the throw.  A crow hop helps with a throw but make sure your body is in motion.

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