Yesterday was one of those magical days of High School baseball we all dream about when it is cold and there is snow on the ground.
The weather was beautiful- most of us got to slip away from work a litte early and enjoy the competition.

At the game a handful of Dads take up a standing position and watch the game un fold. There is non stop chatter about strategies in tne game, the line up, and an exchange of local baseball gossip. At times work topics or world events come up but generally attenion is quickly turned to the game at hand as someone may ask "would you bunt here or let him swing?" immediately discussion is turned from not as important questions like "should we bomb lybia".
All who stand in these little groups have important roles to play that contribute to the experience....
The communications expert who recieves important text messages and provides the scores of other games going on, the foul ball spotter who seems convinced if they do not bellow "HEADS UP" evrytime a ball is hit foul a terrible tradegdy will take place.
The baseball cliches guy..he has an endless supply of them: "take one for the team"'"not your pitch","way to get ahhead" to name a few that have alreday been heard several times this Spring. I think my personal favorite is"right side middle"
The strategist is hard a work questioning everything from where the outfielders are positioned to who is pitching.
The rule expert who doesnt say much unless consulted when controversary occurs.
Everyone has a role and these groups,although informally form, have operated for years effiecintly may be the best club any of us will ever be a part of.
Yes these are magical times where men retreat into little secret think tank type groups, on warm Spring afternoons, where for a couple of hours the rest of the world gets put on hold, and the important pursuit of baseball is dealt with.
Yes these are magical days many of us live for and savor as we have the great priviledge of participating in days like yesterday
Original Post
quote:
Originally posted by hsbasballfan:
Yesterday was one of those magical days of High School baseball we all dream about when it is cold and there is snow on the ground.
The weather was beautiful- most of us got to slip away from work a litte early and enjoy the competition.

At the game a handful of Dads take up a standing position and watch the game un fold. There is non stop chatter about strategies in tne game, the line up, and an exchange of local baseball gossip. At times work topics or world events come up but generally attenion is quickly turned to the game at hand as someone may ask "would you bunt here or let him swing?" immediately discussion is turned from not as important questions like "should we bomb lybia".
All who stand in these little groups have important roles to play that contribute to the experience....
The communications expert who recieves important text messages and provides the scores of other games going on, the foul ball spotter who seems convinced if they do not bellow "HEADS UP" evrytime a ball is hit foul a terrible tradegdy will take place.
The baseball cliches guy..he has an endless supply of them: "take one for the team"'"not your pitch","way to get ahhead" to name a few that have alreday been heard several times this Spring. I think my personal favorite is"right side middle"
The strategist is hard a work questioning everything from where the outfielders are positioned to who is pitching.
The rule expert who doesnt say much unless consulted when controversary occurs.
Everyone has a role and these groups,although informally form, have operated for years effiecintly may be the best club any of us will ever be a part of.
Yes these are magical times where men retreat into little secret think tank type groups, on warm Spring afternoons, where for a couple of hours the rest of the world gets put on hold, and the important pursuit of baseball is dealt with.
Yes these are magical days many of us live for and savor as we have the great priviledge of participating in days like yesterday


Amen!
Can you guys think of other roles played by Genius Club members?

We have identified ...

The Foul Ball Guy(my favorite)
The Rules Guy
The Electronic Communications Guy
The Strategy Guy
The Cliches Guy

Add to the list "The Scout Spotter" and spotter of other people of note...Can can call him the "Look Out Man"

Who else have you seen out there?
As one of the "girls" who:

coached Little League, caught balls for pitching practice (and bought catching gear when he started throwing curve balls that were giving me bruises), threw batting practice (and still does some), hit balls for fielding, and (in general) passed on my love for the sport (that is "baseball" not "softball") to my son,

I can truthfully say, it is not all about men Mad

Okay, I feel better now. Just needed to vent.

By the way, you can slot me in there for "Rules Gal". (Sometimes has made for interesting conversations at work with a guy who umps the local games.)
Great Post!
As a player, then a coach, now a father and coach…that post sums up so many high school baseball fields across the country.
So we have:

The Foul Ball Guy
The Rules Guy
The Electronic Communication Guy (or the play-by-play guy via text message and phone)
The Strategy Guy (usually stands right next to the Rule Guy)
The Cliches Guy (In my experience he’s usually a really good buddy of the Foul Ball guy. Since that’s all they have to add to the conversation)
What about:

The Disgruntled Parent?
You know the one. The one (Mom OR Dad) who’s clueless why their baby boy is sitting the bench. Never mind the fact the kid’s position is behind the best kid on the team, or the kid can’ t drive a ball out of the infield, or you can time the kid with a calendar etc. This parent usually talks heavily about the parent below:

The “Connected” Parent:
Not usually a coach. Likes to be involved with the booster club, organizes things. Could be Mom or Dad. If this parent’s child is a good, or better than good player, it’s not an issue for most people. If the kid is average…look out.

The “Stats” Guy:
Although I will admit I’m starting to see more and more women using their smartphone to keep track with some type of program for scoring and stats. Normally this guy can tell the batting average of every kid on the team. Of course this guy gets quiet if his kid is going through a slump. Trying to explain to this guy that batting .600 in 15 at bats is not really much of a sign of anything, is like talking to a wall. Fun to listen to though. Especially when you can see they obviously have to go to the bathroom, but don't want to miss anything.

I’ll admit I’m enjoying my son playing High school ball. Even though he’s an 8th grader and it’s just JV, it’s still nice to actually WATCH a game from outside the fence, as I still coach travel ball.

Although it is fun to watch other parents’ faces (who don’t know me) when my kid does something and I make fun of him. Recently a Dad apparently got offended and said something to another parent, who informed him that I was talking about my own kid. LOL
At just about any field in America all these roles are filled....

How about :

"The Guy From the Other Team"

He usually has some connection with your own team(his son played on a summer team with someone) and ventures to your side of the field to share informaion/compare notes.

If his team is struggling he fills you in on how bad their coach is and may even go so far as to tell you "wish my son was on your team"

At some point something happens in the game making his pesence uncomfortable and he retreats to his own side of the field most likely providing a report to his fellow fans that starts with...."I was just talking to __________ _________ and he said....
Haven't seen this guy listed: "The Coach Questioner."

This guy talks about every decision and move the coach makes during the game, and if the moves don't work, he second-guesses the coach for having made the move. Of course, if the decision works, he falls silent...for a few moments.

This guy can also be known as the "Head Shaker" or the "Ground Scuffler." He usually has never managed a baseball team, or even worse, the last one he did manage was when his own kid was 8 years old.
I have been calling you "genius men" (for many years now)

FENCE DWELLERS!

How about the
"Great Hit Guy"- you know as the kid is going back to the dugout after he gets out.

How about the
"Sign Guy"- you know the father that gives his kid signs from the stands! Do we know any of those?
I moninate Godwin High School as the "Fence Dwellers Capitol" of the Central Region...on the home side there are guys three deep hanging on the fence throwing out pearls of baseball genius and wisdom!

Crack open a can of ice cold bud! Here's to you Godwin fence dwellers!!
Here's to you "Mr Old Timer Guy"

You've been sitting in the same spot at every home game since the 70's. You are the go to guy for historical data concerning former players, stats, records and those "you should have been there" stories.

Also...

Here's to you "Mr Announcer Guy"

You've given your life to your home team. You've adjusted from simply announcing names to having to include "walk-up music" without missing a beat. And everyone knows that you know more about the program then most of the coaches, or at least you'll have us believe so.
quote:
Originally posted by ctandc:
Great Post!
As a player, then a coach, now a father and coach…that post sums up so many high school baseball fields across the country.
So we have:

The Foul Ball Guy
The Rules Guy
The Electronic Communication Guy (or the play-by-play guy via text message and phone)
The Strategy Guy (usually stands right next to the Rule Guy)
The Cliches Guy (In my experience he’s usually a really good buddy of the Foul Ball guy. Since that’s all they have to add to the conversation)
What about:

The Disgruntled Parent?
You know the one. The one (Mom OR Dad) who’s clueless why their baby boy is sitting the bench. Never mind the fact the kid’s position is behind the best kid on the team, or the kid can’ t drive a ball out of the infield, or you can time the kid with a calendar etc. This parent usually talks heavily about the parent below:

The “Connected” Parent:
Not usually a coach. Likes to be involved with the booster club, organizes things. Could be Mom or Dad. If this parent’s child is a good, or better than good player, it’s not an issue for most people. If the kid is average…look out.

The “Stats” Guy:
Although I will admit I’m starting to see more and more women using their smartphone to keep track with some type of program for scoring and stats. Normally this guy can tell the batting average of every kid on the team. Of course this guy gets quiet if his kid is going through a slump. Trying to explain to this guy that batting .600 in 15 at bats is not really much of a sign of anything, is like talking to a wall. Fun to listen to though. Especially when you can see they obviously have to go to the bathroom, but don't want to miss anything.

I’ll admit I’m enjoying my son playing High school ball. Even though he’s an 8th grader and it’s just JV, it’s still nice to actually WATCH a game from outside the fence, as I still coach travel ball.

Although it is fun to watch other parents’ faces (who don’t know me) when my kid does something and I make fun of him. Recently a Dad apparently got offended and said something to another parent, who informed him that I was talking about my own kid. LOL



One of my former players who became a head coach locally stated this about "disgruntled parents", he called them the "RedAss Society" as I would be very surprised that nearly ever team does not have a society like that within their group.
One more.....Mr Special Effects/Sound Bites Guy. Yesterday we were at the JMU / Cornell game in Harrisonburg. The Sound Bites guy at the JMU game was awesome. He had some of the funniest sound bites or outtakes I've ever heard at a baseball game. He had me and many others laughing pretty hard. Here's to you Mr Sound Effects Guy!

Awesome thread and defintely a Golden thread nominee. I'm absolutely guilty of being several guys in one but never a Fence Dweller Guy or Foul Ball Guy....never! I aspire to be the Mr Old Timer Guy who sits in the same spot with the "you should have bee there" stories......

This thread has made me thirsty.
quote:
Originally posted by hsbasballfan:
I moninate Godwin High School as the "Fence Dwellers Capitol" of the Central Region...on the home side there are guys three deep hanging on the fence throwing out pearls of baseball genius and wisdom!

Crack open a can of ice cold bud! Here's to you Godwin fence dwellers!!


I completely agree with you. If I ever go to a game there, I usually just sit on the visitors side or stand by the press box if there is room.
Love the thread.
I'd suggest a few others at games I've attended.

There is Mr. Real Estate Guy....always shows up 2 hours early with his folding chair and cooler to sit in the spot right behind home plate or right next to the dugout so he can have "the best seat in the house". Most often sits by himself as the rest of the crowd tries to figure out how he gets off work so early to get that same seat a few times a week.

Then there are "those guys" that always sit beyond the outfield fence or away from the crowd. Not sure if they think they are too good for the rest, but really aren't missed by the crowd. The crowd is more mystified as to why game after game someone willingly sits so far away from the action.

Neither of these groups add to the baseball chatter like the rules guy, the cliche guy or the strategy guy, but they always seem to be there come game time.
My experience is that usually those guys are there because they are "self-policers." In other words, they know that they might too involved with yelling at their sons or at the umpires, coaches, etc., so they stay farther away from the action.

One or two guys I know wander away from time to time to grab a smoke, but then return.
I used to be one of those who sat "way out there". It was right after my coaching days were done and it was the best way to not coach my son from the stands.

Also had something to do with nerves. I used to pace the dugout when my son pitched. It was a lot easier to enjoy the game from a distance because I was more apart from the action. I have gotten a lot better and can sit on the stands (or stand by them) now. Smile

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