Just thought I'd share some good news and offer perhaps a little encouragement to anyone who is struggling with the Yips.  My son had nearly ended his career due to the Yips but has gotten through it albeit not without tremendous emotional pain.  Much of it was completely unnecessary.  

One of several observations I made while he struggled with it is how many people in baseball have it from time to time.  Nearly every teammate or former player who talked to him had beaten it but yet we mostly hear about the negative outcomes as you search for a cure.  Given that it is so commonplace in baseball, I'm puzzled why coaches at the collegiate and professional levels are more in tune with helping the player get through it.  

That said, anyone who may be struggling with this should know that the Yips are very beatable.  Hearing the number of success stories along with help from friends in specific drills was the key.  Feel free to reach out if you know someone struggling with this.  If we can help someone else, it would be a pleasure to give back as so many helped my son.  

Original Post
Jim T. posted:

Just thought I'd share some good news and offer perhaps a little encouragement to anyone who is struggling with the Yips.  My son had nearly ended his career due to the Yips but has gotten through it albeit not without tremendous emotional pain.  Much of it was completely unnecessary.  

One of several observations I made while he struggled with it is how many people in baseball have it from time to time.  Nearly every teammate or former player who talked to him had beaten it but yet we mostly hear about the negative outcomes as you search for a cure.  Given that it is so commonplace in baseball, I'm puzzled why coaches at the collegiate and professional levels are more in tune with helping the player get through it.  

That said, anyone who may be struggling with this should know that the Yips are very beatable.  Hearing the number of success stories along with help from friends in specific drills was the key.  Feel free to reach out if you know someone struggling with this.  If we can help someone else, it would be a pleasure to give back as so many helped my son.  

Please enlighten us.  Never know when we'll need some help. 

Jim T. posted:

Just thought I'd share some good news and offer perhaps a little encouragement to anyone who is struggling with the Yips.  My son had nearly ended his career due to the Yips but has gotten through it albeit not without tremendous emotional pain.  Much of it was completely unnecessary.  

One of several observations I made while he struggled with it is how many people in baseball have it from time to time.  Nearly every teammate or former player who talked to him had beaten it but yet we mostly hear about the negative outcomes as you search for a cure.  Given that it is so commonplace in baseball, I'm puzzled why coaches at the collegiate and professional levels are more in tune with helping the player get through it.  

That said, anyone who may be struggling with this should know that the Yips are very beatable.  Hearing the number of success stories along with help from friends in specific drills was the key.  Feel free to reach out if you know someone struggling with this.  If we can help someone else, it would be a pleasure to give back as so many helped my son.  

Most of the time a true case of yips in baseball proceeds an injury. It usually takes a well trained coach to recognize symptoms, then he tries to figure out the cause. In many cases it gets out of control so then counseling prescribed.  

JMO

TPM posted:
Jim T. posted:

Just thought I'd share some good news and offer perhaps a little encouragement to anyone who is struggling with the Yips.  My son had nearly ended his career due to the Yips but has gotten through it albeit not without tremendous emotional pain.  Much of it was completely unnecessary.  

One of several observations I made while he struggled with it is how many people in baseball have it from time to time.  Nearly every teammate or former player who talked to him had beaten it but yet we mostly hear about the negative outcomes as you search for a cure.  Given that it is so commonplace in baseball, I'm puzzled why coaches at the collegiate and professional levels are more in tune with helping the player get through it.  

That said, anyone who may be struggling with this should know that the Yips are very beatable.  Hearing the number of success stories along with help from friends in specific drills was the key.  Feel free to reach out if you know someone struggling with this.  If we can help someone else, it would be a pleasure to give back as so many helped my son.  

Most of the time a true case of yips in baseball proceeds an injury. It usually takes a well trained coach to recognize symptoms, then he tries to figure out the cause. In many cases it gets out of control so then counseling prescribed.  

JMO

I disagree with the use of the term "most of the time".  There are triggers that can include an injury but there's almost always underlying stress or pressures that eventually manifests itself into the Yips.  In every case or story we've encountered, not a single one was proceeded by an injury. 

Jim T. posted:
TPM posted:
Jim T. posted:

Just thought I'd share some good news and offer perhaps a little encouragement to anyone who is struggling with the Yips.  My son had nearly ended his career due to the Yips but has gotten through it albeit not without tremendous emotional pain.  Much of it was completely unnecessary.  

One of several observations I made while he struggled with it is how many people in baseball have it from time to time.  Nearly every teammate or former player who talked to him had beaten it but yet we mostly hear about the negative outcomes as you search for a cure.  Given that it is so commonplace in baseball, I'm puzzled why coaches at the collegiate and professional levels are more in tune with helping the player get through it.  

That said, anyone who may be struggling with this should know that the Yips are very beatable.  Hearing the number of success stories along with help from friends in specific drills was the key.  Feel free to reach out if you know someone struggling with this.  If we can help someone else, it would be a pleasure to give back as so many helped my son.  

Most of the time a true case of yips in baseball proceeds an injury. It usually takes a well trained coach to recognize symptoms, then he tries to figure out the cause. In many cases it gets out of control so then counseling prescribed.  

JMO

I disagree with the use of the term "most of the time".  There are triggers that can include an injury but there's almost always underlying stress or pressures that eventually manifests itself into the Yips.  In every case or story we've encountered, not a single one was proceeded by an injury. 

How many have you encountered. True yips in any sport is usually incurable, perhaps they may have just hit a slump.

I am still going with the injury theory, I did mean for pitchers.

TPM posted:
Jim T. posted:
TPM posted:
Jim T. posted:

Just thought I'd share some good news and offer perhaps a little encouragement to anyone who is struggling with the Yips.  My son had nearly ended his career due to the Yips but has gotten through it albeit not without tremendous emotional pain.  Much of it was completely unnecessary.  

One of several observations I made while he struggled with it is how many people in baseball have it from time to time.  Nearly every teammate or former player who talked to him had beaten it but yet we mostly hear about the negative outcomes as you search for a cure.  Given that it is so commonplace in baseball, I'm puzzled why coaches at the collegiate and professional levels are more in tune with helping the player get through it.  

That said, anyone who may be struggling with this should know that the Yips are very beatable.  Hearing the number of success stories along with help from friends in specific drills was the key.  Feel free to reach out if you know someone struggling with this.  If we can help someone else, it would be a pleasure to give back as so many helped my son.  

Most of the time a true case of yips in baseball proceeds an injury. It usually takes a well trained coach to recognize symptoms, then he tries to figure out the cause. In many cases it gets out of control so then counseling prescribed.  

JMO

I disagree with the use of the term "most of the time".  There are triggers that can include an injury but there's almost always underlying stress or pressures that eventually manifests itself into the Yips.  In every case or story we've encountered, not a single one was proceeded by an injury. 

How many have you encountered. True yips in any sport is usually incurable, perhaps they may have just hit a slump.

I am still going with the injury theory, I did mean for pitchers.

Then your definition of "True Yips" are the Yips which have not been successfully addressed.  You are old school.  I can tell you my friend is a MLB rehab coach and it's something he sees everyday.  Too many unfortunate souls get caught up believing nonsense like you stated.  True Yips or whatever you call are formed in your imagination and they can indeed be cured.  The coach who helped my son also helped dozens and dozens of players.  You don't know what you're talking about and you shouldn't tell people it's "incurable".  I doubt you'll accept your wrong though.  I've seen plenty of your posts to know that.  

Right. You seem to really have a chip on your shoulder, there was no reason to be nasty, please state where I addressed you in that way. 

So you live in Florida, is your MLB trainer down this way, like to speak to him. Get the opinion straight from him. The reason I say this is because at one point when son was getting over surgery, he had issues and thought he had the Yips. His team had him discuss with sports psych, and it was not the Yips but a slump ( you know all players go into slumps and right away someone says it's the yips). A lot of times an injury plays with your head, causes issues.

That's not necessarily the yips. Sorry if that's too old school for ya.

 

My reaction was to your statement that "True yips in any sport is usually incurable".  People come to the website often seeking help or counsel.  Telling parents or young players that what they are going through is "incurable" is nonsense.  It's simply not true.  That's what I'm referring to as being old school.  

Yips is a vague word that just describes an inability to perform certain activities in certain sports.  There are many theories on why it occurs.  

You didnt come here to help parents of young players to learn, you only stated your sons yips were gone. No background on what occurred, how it was treated, or what may have been a factor in cause. You have not come forward with any educational information. Maybe thats why people dont know much about it. But you want us to pass the word on it that its beatable. How?  

So please dont call me out,  I would tell everyone that is not familiar with the term to do their homework.  

There are different theories in what causes this condition and how to treat it. Some claim their isnt such a thing but rather factors such as severe fatigue. Mike Reinold  had a theory it was related to TOS. Psychologists have different theories on how to treat, as do coaches. 

Some will agree it is limited to only college and professional players.

Anyway, glad your son is better, however be careful how you use the word old school when someone gives their opinion.

JMO

 

 

 

Jim T. posted:

Just thought I'd share some good news and offer perhaps a little encouragement to anyone who is struggling with the Yips.  My son had nearly ended his career due to the Yips but has gotten through it albeit not without tremendous emotional pain.  Much of it was completely unnecessary.  

One of several observations I made while he struggled with it is how many people in baseball have it from time to time.  Nearly every teammate or former player who talked to him had beaten it but yet we mostly hear about the negative outcomes as you search for a cure.  Given that it is so commonplace in baseball, I'm puzzled why coaches at the collegiate and professional levels are more in tune with helping the player get through it.  

That said, anyone who may be struggling with this should know that the Yips are very beatable.  Hearing the number of success stories along with help from friends in specific drills was the key.  Feel free to reach out if you know someone struggling with this.  If we can help someone else, it would be a pleasure to give back as so many helped my son.  

Thank you for sharing your story.

How can i contact you to get some more information?  

Marie posted:
Jim T. posted:

Just thought I'd share some good news and offer perhaps a little encouragement to anyone who is struggling with the Yips.  My son had nearly ended his career due to the Yips but has gotten through it albeit not without tremendous emotional pain.  Much of it was completely unnecessary.  

One of several observations I made while he struggled with it is how many people in baseball have it from time to time.  Nearly every teammate or former player who talked to him had beaten it but yet we mostly hear about the negative outcomes as you search for a cure.  Given that it is so commonplace in baseball, I'm puzzled why coaches at the collegiate and professional levels are more in tune with helping the player get through it.  

That said, anyone who may be struggling with this should know that the Yips are very beatable.  Hearing the number of success stories along with help from friends in specific drills was the key.  Feel free to reach out if you know someone struggling with this.  If we can help someone else, it would be a pleasure to give back as so many helped my son.  

Thank you for sharing your story.

How can i contact you to get some more information?  

PM me and I'll provide you with my number

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