Had a question for any one with knowledge on the subject. 

can a Freshman , on an academic scholly, (preferred walk on ish).. transfer to another D1 during winter break and play that year?

Now, before anyone says no, absolutely not..it seems there have been some rare cases where this has occured-and no one seems to know the exact answer including coaches,recruiters and even a call to the NCAA itself.  

Potential transfer "to" school wants to give it a shot.  the transfer "from" school should help out..

either this or he redshirts for this year (probably at the "to" school)

thank you for any help on this. 

Have a great holiday everyone!

 

 

 

Original Post

Here are the relevant issues to understand, they are intertwined:

 

If I understand it correctly, your son could play right away only if he was not "Recruited" as defined below, the school he is leaving grants a release and the school he is going to will certify him.

 

Academic year in residence: Under the basic transfer regulations, you must spend an academic year in residence at the school to which you are transferring. If you transfer from a four-year college to an NCAA school, you must complete one academic year in residence at the new school before you can play for or receive travel expenses from the new school, unless you qualify for a transfer exception or waiver. To satisfy an academic year in residence, you must be enrolled in and successfully complete a full-time program of studies for two-full semesters or three-full quarters. Summer school terms and part-time enrollment do not count toward fulfilling an academic year in residence.

 

One-time transfer exception: If you transfer from a four-year school, you may be immediately eligible to compete at your new school if you meet ALL the following conditions:

  • You are transferring to a Division II or III school, or you are transferring to a Division I school in any sport other than baseball, men's or women's basketball, football (Football Bowl Subdivision) or men’s ice hockey. If you are transferring to a Division I school for any of the previously-listed sports, you may be eligible to compete immediately if you were not recruited by your original school and you have never received an athletics scholarship.
  • You are academically and athletically eligible at your previous four-year school.
  • You receive a transfer-release agreement from your previous four-year school.

 

Recruited: If a college coach calls you more than once, contacts you off campus, pays your expenses to visit the campus, or in Divisions I and II, issues you a National Letter of Intent or a written offer of financial aid, you are considered to be recruited.  In Division I, a written offer of financial aid to attend summer school before full-time enrollment does not mean you have been recruited.

 

Certifying school: The new school that you want to attend determines whether you are eligible to play.

My research, and experience, says no.  

A bit of a head scratcher for me, especially with the NCAA's much ballyhooed latest ruling that allows $0 players "to transfer without having to sit out a year."  No one ever mentions that to benefit from this "no penalty" transfer opportunity, is it must be done in the summer.  Between seasons.  

Once a player sets foot in the classroom for their fall semester, $$ or $0, they now are subject to the "365-Day Rule," which says (my interpretation): if a player leaves a team during the school year they may not play for another team until 365-days has elapsed since their departure from original team.  $$ or $0.

Now, one can appeal to NCAA I'd imagine for extenuating circumstances, but no guarantees there.  

22and25 posted:

Here are the relevant issues to understand, they are intertwined:

 

If I understand it correctly, your son could play right away only if he was not "Recruited" as defined below, the school he is leaving grants a release and the school he is going to will certify him.

 

Academic year in residence: Under the basic transfer regulations, you must spend an academic year in residence at the school to which you are transferring. If you transfer from a four-year college to an NCAA school, you must complete one academic year in residence at the new school before you can play for or receive travel expenses from the new school, unless you qualify for a transfer exception or waiver. To satisfy an academic year in residence, you must be enrolled in and successfully complete a full-time program of studies for two-full semesters or three-full quarters. Summer school terms and part-time enrollment do not count toward fulfilling an academic year in residence.

 

One-time transfer exception: If you transfer from a four-year school, you may be immediately eligible to compete at your new school if you meet ALL the following conditions:

  • You are transferring to a Division II or III school, or you are transferring to a Division I school in any sport other than baseball, men's or women's basketball, football (Football Bowl Subdivision) or men’s ice hockey. If you are transferring to a Division I school for any of the previously-listed sports, you may be eligible to compete immediately if you were not recruited by your original school and you have never received an athletics scholarship.
  • You are academically and athletically eligible at your previous four-year school.
  • You receive a transfer-release agreement from your previous four-year school.

 

Recruited: If a college coach calls you more than once, contacts you off campus, pays your expenses to visit the campus, or in Divisions I and II, issues you a National Letter of Intent or a written offer of financial aid, you are considered to be recruited.  In Division I, a written offer of financial aid to attend summer school before full-time enrollment does not mean you have been recruited.

 

Certifying school: The new school that you want to attend determines whether you are eligible to play.

Thank you for that . 

The only tricky part for us in there is the "not recruited by original school "  which can be a wide interpretation.

Did he visit the school?  yes , but he visited other schools as well.  Was he recruited?  Hmm , a good question..maybe he thought he was being recruited but instead he walked into an open tryout situation along with 35 or so other "new players and transfers" .  Being told one thing and then having something else opposite happen could cause a challenge to the "were you recruited " question. 

I will contact Rick as many on here has said to do 

 

 

 

fishnsail posted:
22and25 posted:

Here are the relevant issues to understand, they are intertwined:

 

If I understand it correctly, your son could play right away only if he was not "Recruited" as defined below, the school he is leaving grants a release and the school he is going to will certify him.

 

Academic year in residence: Under the basic transfer regulations, you must spend an academic year in residence at the school to which you are transferring. If you transfer from a four-year college to an NCAA school, you must complete one academic year in residence at the new school before you can play for or receive travel expenses from the new school, unless you qualify for a transfer exception or waiver. To satisfy an academic year in residence, you must be enrolled in and successfully complete a full-time program of studies for two-full semesters or three-full quarters. Summer school terms and part-time enrollment do not count toward fulfilling an academic year in residence.

 

One-time transfer exception: If you transfer from a four-year school, you may be immediately eligible to compete at your new school if you meet ALL the following conditions:

  • You are transferring to a Division II or III school, or you are transferring to a Division I school in any sport other than baseball, men's or women's basketball, football (Football Bowl Subdivision) or men’s ice hockey. If you are transferring to a Division I school for any of the previously-listed sports, you may be eligible to compete immediately if you were not recruited by your original school and you have never received an athletics scholarship.
  • You are academically and athletically eligible at your previous four-year school.
  • You receive a transfer-release agreement from your previous four-year school.

 

Recruited: If a college coach calls you more than once, contacts you off campus, pays your expenses to visit the campus, or in Divisions I and II, issues you a National Letter of Intent or a written offer of financial aid, you are considered to be recruited.  In Division I, a written offer of financial aid to attend summer school before full-time enrollment does not mean you have been recruited.

 

Certifying school: The new school that you want to attend determines whether you are eligible to play.

Thank you for that . 

The only tricky part for us in there is the "not recruited by original school "  which can be a wide interpretation.

Did he visit the school?  yes , but he visited other schools as well.  Was he recruited?  Hmm , a good question..maybe he thought he was being recruited but instead he walked into an open tryout situation along with 35 or so other "new players and transfers" .  Being told one thing and then having something else opposite happen could cause a challenge to the "were you recruited " question. 

I will contact Rick as many on here has said to do 

 

 

 

If he thought he was being recruited then, unfortunately, he probably was in the eyes of the NCAA.  The definition of recruited on the NCAA page is all that matters in that regard. It sounds like you feel like he was lied to, that doesn't really matter for the purpose of your question, except perhaps in an appeal to the NCAA for an exception. 

 

If his answer to any of the following questions is "yes", he was recruited according the NCAA for transfer purposes.

 

Did a coach from your current school call you more than once?

Did a coach from your current school contacts you off campus?

Did they pay your expenses to visit the campus?

Did you sign a National Letter of Intent or a written offer of financial aid?

 

If he can honestly answer "no" to all of those questions then he may have a shot at playing right away just based on how I read the relevant rules.  I hope it works out that way, it sounds like he was put into a bad position by his current school.

 I would agree with the others though, get help from a pro who deals with this for a living.  

You said preferred walk on (ish)  I'd say if that's the case he was recruited.  What do you mean by ish in this case?  A preferred walk on doesn't get money, but does have a roster spot come Spring.  Are you saying that's no longer the case?   I think what people don't understand is that as a walk on, your odds of making the roster are somewhere between slim and none.  As  a preferred walk on, you're on the roster, but unless you really impress the staff, your odds of seeing the field are also very slim.  I have a friend whose son was at fall practice with my son their freshman year.  Talking to her, she had no idea if he was a walk on or preferred walk on.  She was honestly shocked when fall practice ended and he was told he doesn't have a spot for the Spring. 

He was a preffered walk on with no roster spot.  Verbally at our visit before he went there they said he would have a roster spot but when it came down to commitment this is what they said:

“This letter is stating my commitment to the ****** Baseball program as a preferred walk-on for the 2018-2019
season. I understand that this is a non-binding document and I am
voluntarily attending the ******* on an academic
scholarship.  My position on the team is contingent upon following
****** Baseball team rules and standards,*******Athletic Department policies, ******* Code of Conduct, NCAA policies, as well as, maintaining a good
academic standing. I understand this letter does not guarantee a
roster or travel spot during the 2019 season or any season there
after, but acknowledges my voluntary commitment to the ******* Baseball Program.”

 

this was a major red flag but it was so late in the game that unfortunately we made the very wrong decision. 

then when we got to the school instead of 40-45 there was 60 looking for a roster spot. 

basically it was a huge learning process and everything happens for a reason. He seems to be going to a better academic school now and a program that wants him and doesnt over recruit.  the question is can he play this year?

Have a call scheduled with Rick today , I will find out. 

Hope this can help others in the future. 

 

 

 

fishnsail posted:

He was a preffered walk on with no roster spot.  Verbally at our visit before he went there they said he would have a roster spot but when it came down to commitment this is what they said:

“This letter is stating my commitment to the ****** Baseball program as a preferred walk-on for the 2018-2019
season. I understand that this is a non-binding document and I am
voluntarily attending the ******* on an academic
scholarship.  My position on the team is contingent upon following
****** Baseball team rules and standards,*******Athletic Department policies, ******* Code of Conduct, NCAA policies, as well as, maintaining a good
academic standing. I understand this letter does not guarantee a
roster or travel spot during the 2019 season or any season there
after, but acknowledges my voluntary commitment to the ******* Baseball Program.”

 

this was a major red flag but it was so late in the game that unfortunately we made the very wrong decision. 

then when we got to the school instead of 40-45 there was 60 looking for a roster spot. 

basically it was a huge learning process and everything happens for a reason. He seems to be going to a better academic school now and a program that wants him and doesnt over recruit.  the question is can he play this year?

Have a call scheduled with Rick today , I will find out. 

Hope this can help others in the future. 

 

 

 

Fishnsail,

Your candor and discretion in sharing this information and experience is precisely why this site is so valuable to families.  Best of luck to your son moving forward.  

Glad you have a phone call scheduled with Rick, at Informed Athlete this afternoon.  Rick makes his livelihood sharing his wealth of knowledge with families like yours, and mine.  We have found that his counsel is well worth the modest compensation he requests.  

Good luck. 

adbono posted:

I am very interested in hearing the outcome 

I'm also extremely curious about the outcome.   As I read this you say he was a Preferred WO.  There is no preferred walk-on status with the NCAA, only recruited athlete.  There is no athletic consideration ($)  only an opportunity to walk-on just as any student is allowed to do.  So, I believe the ambiguity is around the coaches/schools designation of preferred walk-on and the NCAAs definition of a recruited athlete.

Best of luck, I've got my fingers crossed for you.

PS...I hate the coaching terminology "preferred walk-on".  My son was in a similar situation with an SEC school offering academic money and an "opportunity" to make the baseball team.

Yes "preferred walk-on" is yet another slippery term in the recruiting quagmire.  It seems that the most common definition is that the student athlete will receive no athletic aid, but has a guaranteed roster spot assuming he works hard, follows team rules, keeps grades up, etc.  But here the Coach apparently uses the term differently - no guaranteed roster spot arggghhh....

I admit I am "pro-labor" on these issues LOL, but the letter the student athlete received here should be a good indication that he was not "recruited" - it gives no inducements and promises nothing!!  The NCAA of course probably looks at it differently.  Curious what Rick's take is.  Good luck to OP and his son.

Thank you everyone and I would like to keep up the current trend of telling our stories that maybe can benefit other families and players in the future :

Son flew out to visit the potential "New", transfer to school, the day after XMAS with my wife 2000 miles away. Though it was a new area for him my son immediately felt like it was a great fit.  HC met them and toured them around. School is a smaller school but much better academically with smaller classes and a great atmosphere. They seemed to hit it off and really made my son feel wanted (which is a major part of the equation).   Unlike the situation in the previous school ,which was a one sided deal (all the risk on the student athlete and zero on the school) -this school is bending over backwards to try to make this transfer smooth and do what ever they can to get him that "play this spring" waiver. 

I spoke to Rick at Informed Athlete,  a couple days ago.  He was a wealth of knowledge.  It seems that this waiver is a super longshot at best despite how it could be seen as incredibly one sided in favor of the school (in my son's case)

NCAA Division I Bylaw 14.5.5.5 Baseball and Basketball—Midyear Enrollee. In baseball and basketball, a student-athlete who initially enrolls at the certifying institution as a full-time student after the conclusion of the first term of the academic year and qualifies for an exception to the one-year residence requirement shall not be eligible for competition until the ensuing academic year.

So playing this spring seems like a real longshot, but he will be on the 35 man roster regardless, be a part of the team and be able to practice with the team.  School starts in less than 2 weeks and we are scrambling about logistical type things now, such as flying or driving out there (he wants his car,  but 2k miles 2x a year?) ,signing up for classes, all the transcripts and medical docs, the new roommate etc...

We probably won't be finding out about the waiver until End of Jan.  No problem. Son seems excited about the new school.  The previous school wasn't a good fit academically and athletically - I wish we realized that way sooner, before deciding to go there..  Life is about overcoming adversity.  Sometimes you need to make the wrong decision to find your right path. 

Will let everyone know what happens. Best wishes to all of you and thank you so much for helping out. 

Have a great 2020!

collegebaseballrecruitingguide posted:

I’m sure he finished the term and earned transferrable credits (hopefully). That takes a little of the sting out of a scenario like this, but is also illustrates that you should not go to a school you aren’t willing to stay at if baseball leaves the equation.

Exactly.  While the transferring situation  typically adds more financial burden(on me anyway), at least he successfully completed one full semester at the  previous school.  Because he did well there we were able to get about a 45 percent Academic scholorship at new school .

College isn't cheap and I do not wish on everybody.

We are hitting the road tomorrow for the 2k mile trek to new school (even more $$), but it should be fun

collegebaseballrecruitingguide posted:

I’m sure he finished the term and earned transferrable credits (hopefully). That takes a little of the sting out of a scenario like this, but is also illustrates that you should not go to a school you aren’t willing to stay at if baseball leaves the equation.

Not to hijack the thread, but isn't the reality for a large majority of our kids that want to continue to play baseball in college, that they will transfer for another opportunity if the 1st one doesn't work out?  I totally agree with the 40 vs 4 year philosophy, and I have also learned over the past several years that the transfer rate in baseball is very high for a large number of reasons (perhaps some reasons better than others).  I think that there are many excellent colleges out there (both regionally and nationally - obviously some much better than others) that will provide our kids with a great education and that the vast majority of our kids will graduate from college and become very productive in their chosen careers regardless of what school name is on the diploma.  Just to be clear, if baseball gets you into your dream school, prestigious HA school etc., then that's another factor to consider before leaving.  However, much like the percentage of players who make it to MLB, the percentage of students who are accepted to the more prestigious HA schools is very low, which then indicates that the majority of our kids colleges are somewhere in the middle of the bell curve on the college academic excellence scale.  Many life lessons are also learned along the way thru the transfer process and most would agree that playing on a team is a valuable life lesson in it's own right.

I agree with somebaseballdad that each family really needs to look at the total "cost" of the transfers (financial, academic impact, extra time in school, travel etc.) and how it impacts the family.  All I know is over the past several years I have come to appreciate the fact that there is no one size fits all to any of this and I really enjoy hearing the stories, struggles, advice, joys and everything in between that we share here.  Best of luck to everyone as we head into the 2020 season.

There ought to be a fairly generous set of circumstances in which a player can transfer and play immediately. Change of coaches, ends up not being a good fit, new recruit takes their spot. I mean it's not the kid's fault another can play at a higher level. If there's a team that can use him where's the harm? Besides the financial, it also puts kids at risk of the 5 to play 4. If the OP's kid breaks his arm at the beginning of next season then he's not going to get to fulfill his college eligibility. Zero tolerance rules very rarely make sense and this is one of them. In a lot of cases the athlete is being punished for something out of their control.

And the whole "the student needs a chance to adjust to their new surroundings". By that way of thinking no incoming freshman should be allowed to play.

SomeBaseballDad posted:

There ought to be a fairly generous set of circumstances in which a player can transfer and play immediately. Change of coaches, ends up not being a good fit, new recruit takes their spot. I mean it's not the kid's fault another can play at a higher level. If there's a team that can use him where's the harm? Besides the financial, it also puts kids at risk of the 5 to play 4. If the OP's kid breaks his arm at the beginning of next season then he's not going to get to fulfill his college eligibility. Zero tolerance rules very rarely make sense and this is one of them. In a lot of cases the athlete is being punished for something out of their control.

And the whole "the student needs a chance to adjust to their new surroundings". By that way of thinking no incoming freshman should be allowed to play.

Very well said and I agree 100% !

I had always heard rumblings and grumblings about the NCAA and their rules and power over the years in the news(mainly football and basketball) and hearing some baseball stories from others and was always like "That NCAA , they have a heavy hand but maybe they have their reasons"

 Then when you see it first hand- an obvious  "No Brainer" situation where the student was misled  and transferring for the betterment of themselves and at no harm to anyone at all(I am sure like 1000's of others have done in many sports)

that is when you wonder..The NCAA :

who is making the rules and final decisions?

it would seem like they are there to protect the universities way way more than the students. 

why is that? 

I am surprised that somewhere along the line no one has fully challenged them in the higher courts for many of their one sided decision making process that could help other students athletes in the future.  

it is just a thought...

fishnsail posted:
it would seem like they are there to protect the universities way way more than the students. 

why is that? 

I am surprised that somewhere along the line no one has fully challenged them in the higher courts for many of their one sided decision making process that could help other students athletes in the future.  

it is just a thought...

Who do you think funds them...

Maybe some athlete who's dad is a lawyer. Besides that, they'd just drag it out until you couldn't afford to pursue it any longer. And, look at the replies here. People just accept it.

I don't like the NCAA as much as the next guy, but to say that anybody should be able to transfer regardless of the reason is irresponsible. If there were no transfer limitations everybody would ditch their school and head to the powerhouses. I understand baseball is a bit different from football and basketball, but there will always be a problem somewhere down the line. Lets say transferring is fine anytime anywhere. Then the issue becomes transferring credits. Then when players become ineligible because their credits didn't transfer the argument turns into well the NCAA shouldn't have rules stating a player needs 24 credits in a year to remain eligible. 

I think non scholarship players should be able to transfer at any time and I think coaches should be able to sign a release for immediate eligibility for certain players who may have better opportunities elsewhere. But there are guys who are behind a stud junior who want to transfer because they don't start every game as a true freshmen too. That shouldn't be allowed. Even high schools have transfer rules so to blame the NCAA, well they're not alone. 

It happened at 2019s school. A sophomore position player did not win the starting job at his position behind a senior (who did not sign as a junior). They're putting him at third where he will still bat in the middle of the order. He would 100% be the starter next year, but instead he is transferring to their rival instead where he would have an immediate impact. Why would the coach want that? Technically he was misled by the coaching staff while being recruited. Should he get a pass or should he have to sit out? 

Trying to imagine myself as the kid mentioned. Mislead by coaching staff and have the opportunity to make an immediate impact with another team at the same level of play. Rival or not and all other things equal, I don't think I would stay either if I had the option.

PS. I should mention that I'm not the biggest fan of the NCAA, and the way "Student Athletes" are handled. However, that might be a topic for another thread.    

PABaseball posted:

I don't like the NCAA as much as the next guy, but to say that anybody should be able to transfer regardless of the reason is irresponsible. If there were no transfer limitations everybody would ditch their school and head to the powerhouses. I understand baseball is a bit different from football and basketball, but there will always be a problem somewhere down the line. Lets say transferring is fine anytime anywhere. Then the issue becomes transferring credits. Then when players become ineligible because their credits didn't transfer the argument turns into well the NCAA shouldn't have rules stating a player needs 24 credits in a year to remain eligible. 

I think non scholarship players should be able to transfer at any time and I think coaches should be able to sign a release for immediate eligibility for certain players who may have better opportunities elsewhere. But there are guys who are behind a stud junior who want to transfer because they don't start every game as a true freshmen too. That shouldn't be allowed. Even high schools have transfer rules so to blame the NCAA, well they're not alone. 

It happened at 2019s school. A sophomore position player did not win the starting job at his position behind a senior (who did not sign as a junior). They're putting him at third where he will still bat in the middle of the order. He would 100% be the starter next year, but instead he is transferring to their rival instead where he would have an immediate impact. Why would the coach want that? Technically he was misled by the coaching staff while being recruited. Should he get a pass or should he have to sit out? 

+1.  I agree with everything.  I would add that player should be given an option to transfer out if the coach takes a new job at a different school.  That player would become a free-agent to every school except where the coach is going.  In essence, the coach would not be able to take players with him, and the players have the option of making a change.   This would force AD and college administrators to be more thorough and thoughtful about coaching changes.

JMO.

I believe the sit out a year rule was implemented because too many players were transferring and not working towards a degree. I believe APR (applies to all sports) was implemented about the same time. But there are circumstances where sitting out a year should not be required with a complex waiver process. 

fenwaysouth posted:
PABaseball posted:

I don't like the NCAA as much as the next guy, but to say that anybody should be able to transfer regardless of the reason is irresponsible. If there were no transfer limitations everybody would ditch their school and head to the powerhouses. I understand baseball is a bit different from football and basketball, but there will always be a problem somewhere down the line. Lets say transferring is fine anytime anywhere. Then the issue becomes transferring credits. Then when players become ineligible because their credits didn't transfer the argument turns into well the NCAA shouldn't have rules stating a player needs 24 credits in a year to remain eligible. 

I think non scholarship players should be able to transfer at any time and I think coaches should be able to sign a release for immediate eligibility for certain players who may have better opportunities elsewhere. But there are guys who are behind a stud junior who want to transfer because they don't start every game as a true freshmen too. That shouldn't be allowed. Even high schools have transfer rules so to blame the NCAA, well they're not alone. 

It happened at 2019s school. A sophomore position player did not win the starting job at his position behind a senior (who did not sign as a junior). They're putting him at third where he will still bat in the middle of the order. He would 100% be the starter next year, but instead he is transferring to their rival instead where he would have an immediate impact. Why would the coach want that? Technically he was misled by the coaching staff while being recruited. Should he get a pass or should he have to sit out? 

+1.  I agree with everything.  I would add that player should be given an option to transfer out if the coach takes a new job at a different school.  That player would become a free-agent to every school except where the coach is going.  In essence, the coach would not be able to take players with him, and the players have the option of making a change.   This would force AD and college administrators to be more thorough and thoughtful about coaching changes.

JMO.

You see coaches leaves from one program to the next every year and players from their old teams will transfer with them to their new programs, either incoming freshmen or established players (at least two I know of personally happened this summer)...so....if a player is recruited and goes to a school because of a particular coach, it seems they are having no problem leaving to play for that same coach when he leaves for greener pastures.

I know that many of the NCAA transfer rules were implemented because some athletes were taking advantage of the system.   But.. there has to be some kind of leanancy towards a transfer from the fall to play in the spring for another school if:

1- They were not on athletic scholarship

2- They received their 12+ fall credits and did well in school

3-the school that they are leaving from agrees to and recommends it. 

should be an open and shut case but , based on what I am hearing, the chances of my son's waiver to get approved is like  .00000189 %  .  There just is no flexibility within the NCAA rules and they do not bend for anything unless extreme special circumstances which is beyond rare. 

with that being said I am happy that he is in a better situation no matter what the NCAA says. 

 

 

 

ReluctantO'sFan posted:

Trying to imagine myself as the kid mentioned. Mislead by coaching staff and have the opportunity to make an immediate impact with another team at the same level of play. Rival or not and all other things equal, I don't think I would stay either if I had the option.

He will have an immediate impact for his original school as well, he will be the 5 hitter but instead of playing short he will play third. Next year he would be the starting SS with 3 years of eligibility. The point was more so why would the coach of the first school want to play against him 3+ times a year in games that decide who goes to the NCAA tournament. Achievement markers that determine whether the coach keeps his job or not. 

PAbaseball,

Sounds like they needed to think about that before misleading the player. They made that bed, now they should have to sleep in it. At least that's the way I read it, but I'm sure there is a lot more to the story. Decisions like this rarely, if ever, happen in a vacuum. 

Like I said before, I'm not a big fan of the NCAA. The older I've gotten the more I see the true business side of "amateur sports".  

 

 

ReluctantO'sFan posted:

PAbaseball,

Sounds like they needed to think about that before misleading the player. They made that bed, now they should have to sleep in it. At least that's the way I read it, but I'm sure there is a lot more to the story. Decisions like this rarely, if ever, happen in a vacuum. 

Like I said before, I'm not a big fan of the NCAA. The older I've gotten the more I see the true business side of "amateur sports".  

Who said anything about misleading? The starter was an all conference sophomore when this kid was a senior in high school. Draft didn't go his way as a junior. He's back and the younger guy is not as good, simple as that. Either way he won't be starting at SS for either team as he has to sit out a year at new school. The options were start at third and play every day or go to new school and sit every day. 

I have no dog in this fight. All I'm pointing out is that there may be circumstances in which the NCAA has it right. I believe this to be one of them. I'm not for the NCAA punishing kids who might be better off somewhere else, but I am for the NCAA protecting programs from players jumping ship to spite the coach. 

The simple answer to the question: You did!

"Technically he was misled by the coaching staff while being recruited." 

As far as sitting out a year, that's what we've been talking about. I don't think he should have to. I'm sure this kid feels like he would be better off somewhere else. Maybe somewhere the coaching staff isn't misleading??? I'm just saying my initial post was valid based off the info given. Anything additionally added can change the narrative. 

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