Gunner Mack Jr. posted:
LousyLefty posted:

The problem is that many of the great Engineering schools that are a good academic fit are strong baseball programs as well.

How realistic is it to be an Engineering major and a D1 baseball player?  I am just throwing it out there because one of my son's teammates was told directly by a school (D3) they prefer not to recruit engineering majors due to the workload.....   Just relaying what I heard.   

Ask Fenwaysouth's son - he did it -- at an Ivy League school nonetheless!  

Good things come to those who hustle.

--Chuck Noll

6'4 205 LHP touching 86 as a sophomore gets him an offer at any mid-major in the Midwest...and likely some of the bigger D1's if he can throw strikes.   If you haven't already done so, get a video together of him on the mound and have his measurables verified by someone.  Send it to RC's of schools he's interested in.  You'll get some responses.  As others have said, if he can be 87-88 this summer, you'll have plenty of interest.   My son is an assistant at a NAIA school here in Ohio.  I'm sure they'd be interested

Lousylefty, there are many threads here regarding combination of engineering and baseball.  You can search by topic.  On one hand, realistically, it does narrow the schools down considerably.  On the other hand, a player with a high skill set and the desire to pursue the engineering major is highly regarded and sought after by that smaller pool of schools.  As Qhead suggested, Fenway will also be a tremendous resource.  I know of a handful of schools at lower levels but sounds like your player may be able to reach higher.  I will throw out Colorado School of Mines just as in interesting example to take a look at, considering you are in the west.  Of course, type of engineering comes into play as well.

LousyLefty posted:
Goosegg posted:

I'm from Southern Cal. While it's a fact that Cal schools have mostly Cal kids (similar to other states), i can name dozens of kids who attended and/or were recruited by out of state schools. I personally know kids who played D1 at every Ivy school, most Patriot league schools, Clemson, LSU, New Mexico (both state and U), Arizona (state and U), Miami of Ohio, Indiana, Oregon (State and U), Charleston, Maryland, Washington, Purdue, Nevada, to name a few. As for D3, even more.

Coaches will recruit from anywhere a player domiciles - it requires a well thought out plan to play before your target schools and the skills needed to get the RCs' attention. Also, keep in mind that (at least anecdotally from posts over the years here) that there seems to be a preference to play within  a few hours drive of home. 

 

Goosegg, since this thread has gone a little off-track, care to go a little further?  What would you suggest are part of a well-thought out plan for a SoCal kid who may have to leave to leave the land of eternal summer to find a good academic and baseball fit? My 2022LHP is strong academically and projects to be D1 (6'1" still growing,throwing low 80's but doesn't have his "man body" muscles yet, 155lbs soaking wet, clearly still in puberty) but who knows...The problem is that many of the great Engineering schools that are a good academic fit are strong baseball programs as well.  Maybe he'll get up to 90, maybe he'll top out in the upper 80's, how can you project that with accuracy?  Of course we'd love for him to start throwing heat and go to UCLA, but I prefer to make a realistic plan.

Depending on his growth/strength, we were planning on a Headfirst this coming summer, before that doing a PBR event to get published numbers so that we can send those along with video ahead of time.  He plays for a reputable travel program within CA but we don't go to events further than AZ.  Players from our program are placed throughout the country, but are fewer and far between the further east you go.  

Not D1 but in California one of the better Engineering schools already exists. And I am not talking Cal-tech. Harvey Mudd.

https://www.usnews.com/best-co...171/overall-rankings

They partner Claremont and Scripps to field a team in the sciac. The coach there used to be the coach at Div 1 Cornell, so he is well versed in High academic schools. 

https://www.cmsathletics.org/s...enbach_bill?view=bio

If your son is not a realistic Pro Prospect, it might be a good alternative.  Be aware their acceptance rate is around 13 percent. 

If you want to go further out there is Rose Hulman in Terre Haute Indiana.

https://rosehulman.prestosports.com/sports/bsb/index

There acceptance rate is quite a bit higher at 61%

https://www.usnews.com/best-co...e-of-technology-1830

And rank very well. 

I know it is not D1, but it does not hurt to keep your options open.

 

Lefty, sent you a PM, but thought I'd give a speil on this thought:   "I'm not ready to have the conversation that he may have to choose one dream over the other, yet."

No kid NEEDS to sacrifice non-baseball career aspirations to play baseball. If a kid has pro-potential, he will be found NO MATTER WHERE HE PLAYS. If he simply wants to enjoy college as an athlete, virtually every college can fit that bill.  

Now, there are many colleges where a player WILL sacrifice potential careers (majors); but, to what end? (Especially when there are colleges which don't require such a Hobson's choice.)

Gunner Mack Jr. posted:
LousyLefty posted:

The problem is that many of the great Engineering schools that are a good academic fit are strong baseball programs as well.

How realistic is it to be an Engineering major and a D1 baseball player?  I am just throwing it out there because one of my son's teammates was told directly by a school (D3) they prefer not to recruit engineering majors due to the workload.....   Just relaying what I heard.   

Most HC's dislike any curriculum which requires "labs" late in the week. It's very difficult to be an athlete, let alone a D1 athlete with its aggressive schedule and pursue a technical degree.  Even with top D3 HA's it's difficult. Caltech and MIT are the exceptions, because athletics revolve around technical programs.  The Cornell HC told our club program head the past season he was trying to avoid recruiting too many players with engineering aspirations.

coachld posted:

Check out Cal Poly. Great engineering school and a quality D1 baseball program.

CoachLD, this is kinda funny... I'm California throwing out a Colorado example (School of Mines) and you're Colorado throwing out a California example. 

Poly is in my back yard (25 minute drive).  These two schools represent some interesting dynamics with the choices a player with engineering path will be faced with.  Cal Poly is often a top 25 ranked D1 baseball program.  The engineering program is absolutely top notch but the school has a full breadth of other majors and I don't believe very many of the players are engineering majors (they don't list this).  I do recall when a few players who were engineer majors had success on the field, it was celebrated in the media as an extremely difficult path to conquer.  I know what coach Lee recruits (I've had a few players play for him and/or been on his radar) and you better be a true top D1 prospect to get his attention.  And don't expect special allowance given to your schedule as it pertains to dealing with a difficult major with heavy lab and/or external requirements.

School of Mines has a very good D2 baseball program and almost every single player is an engineering major, as are most at the school.  So, the baseball program working around class and lab schedules is far more likely in this scenario.  Also, your roommates are going to also be engineering majors, etc.

Not saying one is better or worse but good examples of what to be aware of.

LousyLefty posted: 

Goosegg, since this thread has gone a little off-track, care to go a little further?  What would you suggest are part of a well-thought out plan for a SoCal kid who may have to leave to leave the land of eternal summer to find a good academic and baseball fit? My 2022LHP is strong academically and projects to be D1 (6'1" still growing,throwing low 80's but doesn't have his "man body" muscles yet, 155lbs soaking wet, clearly still in puberty) but who knows...The problem is that many of the great Engineering schools that are a good academic fit are strong baseball programs as well.  Maybe he'll get up to 90, maybe he'll top out in the upper 80's, how can you project that with accuracy?  Of course we'd love for him to start throwing heat and go to UCLA, but I prefer to make a realistic plan.

Just to consolidate a list of schools who routinely have multiple Engineering majors on their rosters...

Lehigh
UCSD
Trinity TX
Rose Hulman
Case Western Reserve
Milwaukee School of Engineering
Merchant Marine Academy
Colorado School of Mines
Claremont-Mudd-Scripps
Johns Hopkins
Stevens Institute
MIT
Cal Tech
Air Force, Navy, Army
Embry-Riddle
WVU Tech
University of Texas at Dallas
Ohio Northern
Swarthmore

No particular order. Additions and corrections are welcome.

MidAtlanticDad posted:

Just to consolidate a list of schools who routinely have multiple Engineering majors on their rosters...

Lehigh
UCSD
Trinity TX
Rose Hulman
Case Western Reserve
Milwaukee School of Engineering
Merchant Marine Academy
Colorado School of Mines
Claremont-Mudd-Scripps
Johns Hopkins
Stevens Institute

No particular order. Additions and corrections are welcome.

Embry-Riddle, WVU Tech...

Service Academy's are great engineering options.  The HC's fully support all degrees pursued and have tutors travel with the team.  Play D1 baseball, jump out of planes, fly gliders, fly fighters, be an astronaut....What's not to like.  Go AF.

collegebaseballrecruitingguide posted:
baseballhs posted:
RJM posted:

 

** Yes, I realize many D1 pitchers cruise upper 80’s. But to be recruited they better ring the (90) bell a few time at recruiting events.

Agree, we know several lefties that are hitting 87-88, but even non P5 D1s are wanting the 90.  Granted, done of them are 6'4, and that plays into it.  Assuming he isn't maxed out on velo, he projects D1.  Take him to some camps at schools he is interested in.  If they start falling all over him, you know you are in the right pond.

That is far from what I am seeing. 87-88 as a LHP will get you an offer (D1)

Yup. The size will also be very attractive, but even a 5'11" LHP throwing 87 will get all sorts of D1 interest. There gets to be a certain point where you actually have to show that you can pitch, but a 2022 LHP who has touched 86 is intriguing.

 

 BTW, start working on those marks and test scores! That can also help out a coach/RC a lot, and will widen out the schools that he can have appeal for.

 

 

KNOWNOTHINGDAD sorry for hijacking your post.  I'm thinking we will run into eachother at a PBR event in January (nothing listed on website right now but they've had them the last two years) 

Everyone else, thank you for all your insight and the great schools to start what will probably be a long list of potential matches.  

Gov, for the longest time Lefty wanted to go to an academy.  Until he found out he'd have to jump off something high.  Kid doesn't like heights.  Perfect fit other than that one non-negotiable.

cabbagedad posted:
MidAtlanticDad posted:

Just to consolidate a list of schools who routinely have multiple Engineering majors on their rosters...

Lehigh
UCSD
Trinity TX
Rose Hulman
Case Western Reserve
Milwaukee School of Engineering
Merchant Marine Academy
Colorado School of Mines
Claremont-Mudd-Scripps
Johns Hopkins
Stevens Institute

No particular order. Additions and corrections are welcome.

Embry-Riddle, WVU Tech...

University of Texas-Dallas always seems to get overlooked when list of engineering schools that play good baseball gets tossed around.  Not sure why it stays under the radar in terms of public awareness, but it does. Top notch engineering school and very good D3 baseball. Some baseball players are engineering majors and coaching staff will make some accommodations for them. 

My kid thinks KnowNothing's son is D1. Two caveats - he's 15 years old and he catches him on a travel team. Joking aside, I wanted to say that I turned KnowNothingDad onto this website and y'all didn't disappoint with your advice and info. Thanks to all. 

Both Fenwaysouth's and my son played college baseball and received engineering degrees. The list of schools above is a good start, Cal Poly and UCDavis both have had engineering students on their rosters, plus the Ivy's, and Stanford. 

We found out late in the process that STEM and D1 baseball is pretty much incompatible, except for a few cases and it almost requires that the player be a pitcher as they can come and go and get their work in independent of the team. 

Unless your son is a college grad who played baseball (or you are) most people on this site do not understand how very very VERY difficult it is playing baseball and going to college with any serous major. If it is a STEM major fewer have the stamina, drive, physical and mental capacity to do it. When I got my engineering degree we lost over 50% of the students in the first year and another 20% in the Soph year. I think on my son's baseball team 2 players graduated with a STEM degree. I can honestly say that there is no way I could have maintained the schedule my son did and graduate with an engineering degree. For those whose kids are contemplating this path be prepared for them to either drop one or the other. 

Gunner Mack Jr. posted:
LousyLefty posted:

The problem is that many of the great Engineering schools that are a good academic fit are strong baseball programs as well.

How realistic is it to be an Engineering major and a D1 baseball player?  I am just throwing it out there because one of my son's teammates was told directly by a school (D3) they prefer not to recruit engineering majors due to the workload.....   Just relaying what I heard.   

This became a major factor in my son's recruiting journey. He wants to do civil engineering (eventually architecture) and play baseball. Once he started serious conversations with coaches, he learned quickly how critical it would be to find a school where this combination was supported by both coaches and faculty. Some HAs (even an Ivy with a strong engineering program) told him they "don't really have any engineering majors on their rosters"... I agree with Gov that the service academies are a great option (my son considered Air Force Academy). Northwestern University has also had a few engineering/STEM majors on their roster in the last couple of years. Remains to be seen if my son can successfully pull it off, but he was determined to try and find this type of fit which eliminated a lot of schools along the way. It won't be easy and he knows it :-)

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