Tagged With "Baseball Recruiting"

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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Iowamom23 ·
Who cares where I posted it. That's irrelevant. — iIt's only relevant if you care who reads the article. But what was untrue about the article??? You said most if it was untrue? — Never used the word untrue. Never said most of it or even any of it was untrue. Seems like you are seeking an argument rather than feedback, so I'm done.
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
1. Is this the only place you posted this? It appears to be a jobs web site and I'm not sure that's the right audience for people seeking baseball scholarships. It suggests to me (and I doubt you intended this) that if you don't have a job, a baseball scholarship might be a way to go to help your kid with college. Otherwise, I'm not sure how this is an appropriate venue for the piece. It doesn't appear to be a jobs site, it is a jobs site. Who cares where I posted it. That's irrelevant. I...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
RJM: This is for you bucko! And everyone here knows you have an attitude. I wasn’t going to bother since the errors should be obvious to anyone but a rookie. But I guess I’m being challenged to slice and dice the article. The first section is about kiddie ball. No one becomes a college prospect in kiddie ball on a small field. Most college players were preteen stars. But many preteen stars don’t even make their high school team. Many parents can’t recognize the difference between the...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

RJM ·
And everyone here knows you have an attitude. I wasn’t going to bother since the errors should be obvious to anyone but a rookie. But I guess I’m being challenged to slice and dice the article. The first section is about kiddie ball. No one becomes a college prospect in kiddie ball on a small field. Most college players were preteen stars. But many preteen stars don’t even make their high school team. Many parents can’t recognize the difference between the physical early bloomer of a 5”8”...
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Re: What say you...

cabbagedad ·
My thoughts are to drill deeper. I'll start with program B - Many losing programs bring in a new coach who, of course, claims he will turn the program around. What are the real chances that this is the guy? It usually doesn't turn out that way. Playing is great. Playing for a perennial loser and getting hammered regularly can take the joy out in a hurry. Do you see indicators with this guy, beyond his required dialog, that lead to believe maybe he can turn it around? What is his relevant...
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What say you...

MDBallDad ·
Most college baseball programs fall somewhere on the spectrum between perennial winners or regular bottom dwellers. We are faced with those two extremes, so let's set some basic background first. You have a player who is not going to be drafted into the professional ranks so lets assume a baseball career is not going to happen. The player is an excellent student and will likely have a successful financial future associated with what ever academic program they select. So now for the baseball...
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Getting drafted

Shortstopmonkey ·
Hi! my name is Mohamed Salman and i´m a baseball player from sweden. I´m 20 years old and hopefully after summer semester ill be going to US to play college Baseball. My question is: Will the fact that my name is Mohamed lessen my chance of getting drafted? i´ve had this in my mind for a while now and even considered to change my name. Honestly i´m not even a religious guy but it still is my birth name and so i was afraid that it might lessen the chance of me getting drafted. I really want...
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Re: Getting drafted

fenwaysouth ·
Truthfully, I think you are going to have bigger challenges than your first name in trying to play college or professional baseball. It's not easy for the people already living in the US. Their isn't exactly a pipeline of talent coming from Sweden at an older age of 20 years old seeking to play college or professional baseball. There are talented kids drafted out of US and international high schools, Dominican & South American baseball camps and then you have the current college juniors...
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Re: Getting drafted

lionbaseball ·
Considering we have a president with the first name, Obama, I don't think so.
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Re: Getting drafted

jlaro ·
Million Dollar Arm is a film is based on the true story of baseball pitchers Rinku Singh and Dinesh Patel who were discovered by sports agent J.B. Bernstein . What name are thinking about changing it to? Joe Girardi -- Jose perez ?? Make your skills work for you and they will all want to know your name... Good Luck!
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Re: Getting drafted

CatsPop ·
Play hard, give it your best + go by the name of Mo!
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Re: Getting drafted

Shortstopmonkey ·
Hehe you´re right . I guess i was just afraid for no reason. I´m going to a juco in california after summer semester will i be like the only guy that is 20 years old or will there be any other players also in my age?
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Re: Getting drafted

jlaro ·
Originally Posted by CatsPop: Play hard, give it your best + go by the name of Mo! Then when you make the BIG's, you can ask for 'Mo Money'.. 'Mo Money' Maybe like 325 Million, as others do....
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Re: Getting drafted

The Doctor ·
Your name could be Boogey Man as long as you can hit the ball out of the park!
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Re: Getting drafted

TimtheEnchanter ·
I was teased by my name when I first joined the Nights who say Ni, When I mastered flint and tinder no one made fun of my name anymore. Master the fastball and they will be asking for Mo.
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Re: Getting drafted

Shortstopmonkey ·
Hehe thanks for the support guys i feel kind of relieved now
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Re: Getting drafted

2017LHPscrewball ·
Tim - well done in character. Although, didn't the team end up changing its name?
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Re: Getting drafted

Prepster ·
Originally Posted by lionbaseball: Considering we have a president with the first name, Obama, I don't think so. When you come over, make a point of stopping by the White House to meet our President, Obama Barack! If you have the tools and work ethic, professional baseball scouts and their front offices won't care what your name is. Best of luck to you! Keep us posted on your progress!
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Re: Getting drafted

PGStaff ·
Actual full name... Barack Hussein Obama II - President of the United States Best of luck to you " ShortStopMonkey " Your name won't get in your way when it comes to baseball. But there are idiots everywhere in this world . I actually think you could avoid a few potential unneeded problems by using the name Mo or something else . Though I can't help but think of the Three Stooges when I hear the name Mo. Then again I loved the Three Stooges.
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Premier summer teams North Texas - Marshals 15-18U

Marshals Baseball ·
Final Tryouts 15U-18U Marshals Summer 2018 teams SUMMER SELECT TEAM TRYOUTS WHAT: Marshals 15U-18U Tryouts WHEN: Saturday, January 20 TIME: 2:00 P.M. WHERE: Richardson Pearce High School Baseball Field 1600 N Coit Rd, Richardson, TX 75080 BRING: - Baseball appropriate clothing & gear - Water We are called the McKinney Marshals, but we have teams and athletes across the Metroplex and North Texas. Athletes come to play with us from across the state of Texas and Oklahoma. Teams practice in...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

RJM ·
I’ll admit my first reaction was, “Oh boy! Another new poster who thinks he’s going to educate us morons here” while rolling my eyes. But I started reading with an open mind. There’s a lot of very general information. There’s also a significant amount of incorrect information. When I saw the recommendation of a recruiting service I stopped reading. By the way club baseball at a large university is not unofficial D1 baseball.
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The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
Below is an article I wrote after going through the recruiting process with my son the last two years. I hope it answers many of your questions. http://jobapalooza.net/how-to-help-your-son-play-college-baseball-get-a-college-baseball-scholarship/
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
Pitchingfan: Again, coaches are not interested in your son's stats. They need to see him with their own eyes. What does hitting .300 mean? Was it against quality pitching? Does he play in a mecca of great baseball with amazing competition? Does he pitch against the great teams or is he the kid they put in against not so good teams? They do care about metrics. 60 time, exit velo, pitching velocity, different types of pitches, height and weight, grades, test scores, etc. They don't care that...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

d-mac ·
I’ve always been opposed to recruiting services but one of my son’s football teammates used one last year and went from being recruited by D2’s to multiple D1 scholarship offers and preferred walk on offers from numerous top end SEC and Big 12 schools. The kid was 6’4 with the longest arms I’ve ever seen and a huge frame so I’m sure that played a large role. But, nothing started happening until they used the recruiting service very late in the game.
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
...and no one here is "educating" anyone. We are simply sharing information that worked for us. No one is talking down to anyone. I have learned a lot through this site over the years. I just wanted to share.
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
Thanks for the heads up Desertduck!
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Iowamom23 ·
So I do have some criticisms, but I'll try to keep them productive and focused. 1. Is this the only place you posted this? It appears to be a jobs web site and I'm not sure that's the right audience for people seeking baseball scholarships. It suggests to me (and I doubt you intended this) that if you don't have a job, a baseball scholarship might be a way to go to help your kid with college. Otherwise, I'm not sure how this is an appropriate venue for the piece. 2. It's too long. I run an...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
It may not have helped you, or you may not like recruiting services, but I found this particular one to be very helpful. I spend very little of the article talking about the service and I say in the article that if you don't do the heavy lifting, the recruiting service will not get your son to play baseball, but it does have value. I would have never found the schools I did with the service's suggestions of what schools my son was a good fit at. It would have taken me forever to find out...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
Ptchingfan: Again, my article was for folks who want their kids to continue playing after high school. My point was not that Club Baseball was on a par with NCAA baseball, but rather for those kids who just love the game and their priority is academics, they can still play baseball after high school, and they don't need to worry about missing practices, schedules, etc. Club ball is simply just for those who love the game and dont want to stop playing. Obviously, if you are not required to...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

PitchingFan ·
Also not a fan of recruiting services but if you have the money, spend it. I just feel there are better ways to invest your money. I also believe you send your stats in a small ration because coaches do want to know if you can hit. If you are hitting less than .300 in high school you probably can't hit in college and if you have a 9 era in high school you probably cannot pitch in college. It is not heavily weighed but it is information. I also do not believe club ball is anywhere near the...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

DesertDuck ·
Good little overview, Rocky. Nice of you to take the time to share your thoughts and experiences. Should be very helpful to those just starting their journey and looking for a general overview to get them pointed in the right direction. Don't get too worked up over rjm's comments and lack of detail when picking your work apart. Drive-by's are just his style. If he can't relate it to his personal or his kids 'all world, championship experiences' he'll just swing and run. Take a look at his...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

baseballmom ·
NCSA is not too well thought of around here...Just do a search on topics... It's been many years, but one of their "recruiters" posted a few times...Didn't get much of a welcome mat! Understand Mr Rocky, that this site was created about 20 years ago to do for FREE what you claim a "$$$ervice" did for you... We have an incredibly strong network of posters, who are very willing to help new parents navigate the recruiting process. We have lots of experts!!! Some have had 4 sons, twins, etc. We...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

letsgo!!! ·
To keep your athletic $$ you must be a good citizen, stay eligible and not quit.........academic money can have other requirements - maintain specific GPA (mich higher than eligibility). At the end of the day you need to ask questions and read the fine print. The academic money they may show you may only be for one year..or four.....the same can be said for athletic money (although I'm pretty certain p5 must give aid for 4 years)
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
RJM: "Good money" for me is over $200,000. I guess it's all relative. Don't forget to add housing, meal plans, and travel costs. It all adds up.
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

JCG ·
All i did was quote you. Unlike you i made no personal, ad hominim attacks. Where are the admins?
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
Thanks Anotherparent: Correct, my son will play D3 at a top academic school. Had opportunities to play at other D3, NAIA, JC as well. He has a high SAT/ACT and great grades. Healso was recruited by two D2s, but the school are not as prestigious and the love from the coaches wasn't nearly as much as he got from the school he is going to play for. The money we got was also substantially more than any athletic money we could have gotten elsewhere. We made a decision to focus on D2, D3, and NAIA...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

RJM ·
As I posted before you’re inaccuracies are not worth the response. But the one thing that really validates you don’t have a clue is players don’t sign NLI’s unless they are receiving athletic money. Even D1 recruits not receiving money don’t sign them. Keep it coming You’re entertaining. Don’t forget your meds.
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

letsgo!!! ·
I think everyone is splitting hairs on this......I would encourage everyone to have a signing ceremony....its a great accomplishment/milestone. Signing an nli, however, comes with quite a few strings...its at that point that the verbal commitment becomes an actual binding agreement.....that can only be undone with actual reprecusions.
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
True Letsgo!!. I agree. Any player who works hard enough to get to play college ball should be celebrated. But yes, once you sign that NLI for a D1 or D2, you are entering in to an agreement that you play for their pay. You quit, there goes your scholarship (for the most part). But with D3s once you are accepted, you can quit down the road, and you will still keep whatever academic dollars they gave you, because it was not an "athletic" scholarship. Coaches will not be too happy though as...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

RJM ·
Ivys go by a simple formula. If you make good money, even though your boy is a stud, expect to play $80,000. Once again, not true. A family with one kid, a 100K income and 500K in assets pays under 25K per year for Harvard. 125K, under 30K per year. 150K, under 35K per year
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
Letsgo!!, I just read your other post. Yes, if you come from a family that is not well off and you have D1 talent, you have the possibility of going for peanuts. I know many players might want to choose an LSU over a Harvard, but man, that Harvard degree will be worth its weight in gold.
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
Oh, and for all you high brows who dispute that D3 athletes have signing ceremonies, here you go: https://www.dpsk12.org/dps-sen...ational-signing-day/ Go ahead, disparage them you supportive community, you!
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

letsgo!!! ·
......and you would not sign an nli for the ivies.....no athletic $$, no nli....that said, the ivies will give the most reasonable needs based financial aid.....and cant we all just get along...lol.
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
Letsgo: You say, "the ivies will give the most reasonable needs based financial aid." They don't differentiate between students and athletes. Ivys go by a simple formula. If you make good money, even though your boy is a stud, expect to play $80,000. You will pay the same any family will pay with the same financial situation. Many D3s can work with parents and will offer specific academic scholarships or grants to help families pay the tuition. I have found D3s have much more leeway than the...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Iowamom23 ·
Rocky, I honestly don't care that you will say nasty things about me for posting this, but this is simply too egregious and if someone new read your post they could seriously be led astray. Division 3 schools are not allowed to give athletic scholarships — "Division III schools do not offer athletics scholarships."— NCAA web site, link shown below. http://www.ncaa.org/student-at.../future/scholarships People can sign whatever they want to and have whatever ceremony they want to, and they...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
RJM: Again, about 7% of high school players go on to play college baseball at any level. You probably didn't know that expert. By the way, D3 players (dont know why you are slighting them) do sign commitment letters. see: https://www.nsr-inc.com/scouti...ment-letter-to-sign/ Players that sign D3 commitment letters get full rides to their schools. Unlike D2, D3, NAIA, and JCs, if they decide to stop playing ball, they keep their scholarships. You learn something everyday huh expert? And by...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

JCG ·
"By the way, D3 players (dont know why you are slighting them) do sign commitment letters. see: https://www.nsr-inc.com/scouti...ment-letter-to-sign/ " Those are ceremonial only, and I doubt that many schools use them. My son's does not. "Players that sign D3 commitment letters get full rides to their schools." Hahahaha. Do they get a pony too? It would be nice if that was true, but it's not.
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
Iowamom: ahhhh, anyone who has read my article knows I stated D3s don't give "athletic" scholarships. They give academic scholarships. Neither do the Ivy League schools. And I never said "anything nasty" about you. And yes, every signing ceremony is just that...a ceremony.
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
JCJ: Again, 77% of D3 schools have a student body under 2,999. https://www.ncaa.org/sites/def..._edited_20180119.pdf
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
Baesballmom: LOL. Yes, I get paid. You are funny.
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