Two types of coaches.  One who knows what they are doing (several on here) and one who doesn't know what they are doing.  Those that know can take a team of average talent and make them competitive.  Those that don't know might get luck as some veins of talent work thru the school but eventually are exposed.  

I watched type one last night.  Last year had a down year with a very young team and injuries.  Today, with a year under their belts, they are making a move.  But just watch them.  Everyone knows what they are doing and where they should be on EVERY SINGLE PLAY.  It's a pleasure to watch regardless of the score.  

Chico Escuela posted:
Midwest Mom posted:

I don’t understand why this thread keeps going.  This is self aggrandizement at best and fake at worst. It’s not worthy of this site. Why are seasoned members continuing to indulge in this thread?

I mean no disrespect at all when I say this, but if you aren't interested in the topic, then don't read the posts.  If you are getting email notifications and those bother you, then you can turn them off for this thread.  At any given time there are lots of conversations on this board I'm not interested in--and that's fine with me.  

Agreed...

So, we've had the good/bad HS coach discussion many times here at HSBBW.  My questions are these...

1 -After reading all the posts from the OP, do we really think, in this instance, the bigger problem is the coach?

2 -In this instance, are we helping the OP and his kid any by reinforcing his belief that the issues lie with the coach?

 

cabbagedad posted:

So, we've had the good/bad HS coach discussion many times here at HSBBW.  My questions are these...

1 -After reading all the posts from the OP, do we really think, in this instance, the bigger problem is the coach?

2 -In this instance, are we helping the OP and his kid any by reinforcing his belief that the issues lie with the coach?

 

It doesn’t matter if the player or the coach is the problem. The coach makes the lineup. The player has to adjust his attitude to be in the lineup. 

I look at this like crossing the street. I don’t step in front of cars because they’re supposed to stop. I don’t see the value of my dying words being, “I was right. He was wrong.”

1. not the coach

2. I hope that's not what we're doing. I think we can acknowlege that coaches have different agendas without supporting OP's point of view.

I wonder if the OP ever played much himself.  Whoever posted that video of the pawn shop dude, thanks.  The dad was clueless as a dad and it looked like he never learned how to throw properly himself.  Poor kid.

RJM posted:
cabbagedad posted:

So, we've had the good/bad HS coach discussion many times here at HSBBW.  My questions are these...

1 -After reading all the posts from the OP, do we really think, in this instance, the bigger problem is the coach?

2 -In this instance, are we helping the OP and his kid any by reinforcing his belief that the issues lie with the coach?

 

It does matter if the player or the coach is the problem. The coach makes the lineup. The player has to adjust his attitude to be in the lineup. 

I look at this like crossing the street. I don’t step in front of cars because they’re supposed to stop. I don’t see the value of my dying words being, “I was right. He was wrong.”

I'm thinking that you meant, "It doesn't" matter.  You are correct!  It doesn't matter if the coach likes your kid or not.  He makes the line-up, and he is in control.  I've had this conversation with Ryno before.  It doesn't matter how the coach is, you have to figure out what that coach wants you to do.  You have to make him like you, respect your ability, or something to get his attention and get you in the line-up.  It's on you, not on him.  Same way with a teacher.  What do I need to do to get the grade that I want?  Same thing with a boss.

A person will most likely not mesh with every coach, teacher, or boss.  It is up to them to figure it out, or find a new team, class, or job.

Cabbage -

Regards to #1 - We have only heard one side of the story (the OP) and not the coach.  There must be some truth to what he posted, but I'm not totally convinced the coach is "the problem".  How many times has a disgruntled parent posted similar concerns on this board?  And parents (myself included) tend to have a bias (the rose colored glasses thing).

#2 - The OP has two options.  A) try to get the coach replaced, but that will be a time consuming process and won't necessarily result in more playing time for the player involved.  B) Find another school to transfer to, but depending on the state league rules, that has its own pitfalls.  In my state (VHSL), in most cases it involves said student sitting for a year before being allowed to participate in any sport.

 

FoxDad posted:

Cabbage -

Regards to #1 - We have only heard one side of the story (the OP) and not the coach.  There must be some truth to what he posted, but I'm not totally convinced the coach is "the problem".  How many times has a disgruntled parent posted similar concerns on this board?  And parents (myself included) tend to have a bias (the rose colored glasses thing).

#2 - The OP has two options.  A) try to get the coach replaced, but that will be a time consuming process and won't necessarily result in more playing time for the player involved.  B) Find another school to transfer to, but depending on the state league rules, that has its own pitfalls.  In my state (VHSL), in most cases it involves said student sitting for a year before being allowed to participate in any sport.

 

C) Recognize that his focus on what everyone else is doing wrong (in his eyes) has been passed down to his son and there's a learning opportunity for both here. 

Matt13 posted:
FoxDad posted:

Cabbage -

Regards to #1 - We have only heard one side of the story (the OP) and not the coach.  There must be some truth to what he posted, but I'm not totally convinced the coach is "the problem".  How many times has a disgruntled parent posted similar concerns on this board?  And parents (myself included) tend to have a bias (the rose colored glasses thing).

#2 - The OP has two options.  A) try to get the coach replaced, but that will be a time consuming process and won't necessarily result in more playing time for the player involved.  B) Find another school to transfer to, but depending on the state league rules, that has its own pitfalls.  In my state (VHSL), in most cases it involves said student sitting for a year before being allowed to participate in any sport.

 

C) Recognize that his focus on what everyone else is doing wrong (in his eyes) has been passed down to his son and there's a learning opportunity for both here. 

Yeah, that about sums it up... I think a few missed that my questions were rhetorical.

It's not the coaches job to get you to like him. It's the players job to get the coach to like him. How does a player do that? Well he can be the first guy there and the last one to leave. He can do more than everyone else. He can be coachable. He can work to be so good the coach has to put him in the line up. He can look for ways to stand out above everyone else. He can ignore those who would convince him the reason he is not playing is the coach. He can ignore the negative influences in his life. He can do all these things and more. And he can do all these things and more and maybe the coach still won't like him. So for that player what does he gain?

He knows he has done everything he could do. He knows he has been the best he could be. He takes that same attitude, work ethic and game plan to his next stop in baseball and life. He won't have this same coach, boss forever. Or he falls into the trap of finding excuses for his failure. He never develops the mentality that he owns his fate. No it's the coach. No it's the teacher. No it's the cop. No it's your fault. No there's no need to do anything special. No there's no need to do anything, it's out of my hands.

I mean what's the game plan when you relegate yourself to the Coach just doesn't like me option? When you don't play for the next coach what's the reason? The coach just doesn't like me again? Well that's all you know. Their all the same. How do you flip the switch when all you know is "The coach doesn't like me." So the coach is great guy and knows his stuff when your playing but the coach is a clown if I don't? It's the coach silly don't you get it?

Parents who spout this even when it might be true have no idea what they are doing. So these are the tools your going to give them to work with? Instead of saying "What difference does it make? You are who you are regardless of who he is. Make him like you. Don't let him stop you from being all you can be. Be so good he has no choice and if he still doesn't make him look stupid for not playing you. Never let anyone stop you from being the best you can be. Playing time or lack thereof should never change how you go about your business."

I often wonder about these comments about HS coaches. These blanket statements or these "percentages" of HS coaches people use. Just how many HS coaches has your son played for? How many HS coaches do you actually know? How many HS baseball coaching experiences have you actually had? Or are you just basing your opinion on the ONE HS coach your son has had and the numerous conversations you have had with other disgruntled parents of other HS coaches? You know birds of a feather flock together. We all know the reasons our son's don't play. It has nothing to do with his enormous undeniable ability. No the Coach just doesn't like him. We all know the best players routinely sit the pine.

HS coaches are human. Like other humans, some are deeply flawed, even disturbed, individuals. Yes, a player has to deal with this—life is like that and it pays to learn this lesson early. But to defend all coaches unconditionally (which some comments here come awfully close to doing) just isn’t realistic IMO. 

I also believe that at some point (which is going to vary with circumstances, by kid, and by kids’ age) a parent ought to tell a child that “No matter what you do, you may not change this coach’s / teacher’s / boss’s mind.”  The next part of that conversation needs to be about dealing with this fact in the right ways. But for my part, I think there are times when it’s not fair to a kid to just say “work harder, it’s all on you.”  

Chico Escuela posted:

HS coaches are human. Like other humans, some are deeply flawed, even disturbed, individuals. Yes, a player has to deal with this—life is like that and it pays to learn this lesson early. But to defend all coaches unconditionally (which some comments here come awfully close to doing) just isn’t realistic IMO. 

I also believe that at some point (which is going to vary with circumstances, by kid, and by kids’ age) a parent ought to tell a child that “No matter what you do, you may not change this coach’s / teacher’s / boss’s mind.”  The next part of that conversation needs to be about dealing with this fact in the right ways. But for my part, I think there are times when it’s not fair to a kid to just say “work harder, it’s all on you.”  

I think Coach May's post above sums it up quite nicely by using it as a teaching point for your kid's future.  When you say it's not fair to just say, "work harder, it's all on you", what exactly would you say.  There's a fine line between support and support through negativity.  For instance, if I say, "Ryan your coach is a fool, and he should be pitching you more", I am supporting him, but I am supporting him in a negative manner.  This will not be productive.

I've chosen to handle it differently.  "Ryan, I believe your coach should be pitching you more, but honestly, you haven't been getting the job done.  Your control isn't where it needs to be, and you need to make improvements in order for the coach to trust in your abilities."

I don't think anyone here thinks all coaches are right; but as others have stated, it's his kingdom, and you have to please him, not the other way around.

Ryno, I don't think we disagree...

Can you imagine having a conversation with your son in which you acknowledge there really seems to be nothing else he can do, and then talk with him about the fact life isn't fair and that while his coach may be wrong, he's still the coach?  Yeah, almost all conversations are going to boil down to "you have to work harder and try to change your coach's mind."  But I think there are times when you have to say "No matter how hard you work, you may not change this coach's mind.  That's not fair.  But you have to do the best you can and think about what you *can* accomplish, not what you can't." 

I do think some folks here come awfully close to saying HS coaches all are good, honest folks trying to do what's right.  Most HS coaches surely are; I hope *almost* all of them are.  And I get that folks feel the need to defend coaches against parents' natural inclinations to defend their kids and attack their kids' coaches.  I'm just concerned that we not reflexively make kids think the problem is always that they aren't doing enough--that's no healthier than teaching them it's never their fault.

I don't think anyone would come on here and say "All HS coaches are good guys." We all know that's simply not he case even though we all surely wish it was. The same coach who in one person's eyes is the end all to be all is a total failure in another person's eyes. If your son is playing and doing well the coach is all good. If your son is not playing the coach is a clown. Does that happen? Of course it does.

I think it's the right thing to do to be totally honest with your HS player. If your son is not playing do you know why? Does he know why? Are you both honest with each other? If your son is not playing and you can be totally objective and you have all the information needed and your son is being totally honest and he should be playing but is not how do you handle that?

Me personally "Suck it up. Keep working. Yeah he might be wrong but don't make him right. Keep pushing and keep grinding. Prepare for your opportunity don't wait for it. These situations only prepare you for success down the road. Man up and keeping fighting."

I have never seen a negative person who blames others for his failures change his lot. A negative seed yields a negative crop. On the other hand I have seen what a positive person who takes total ownership in his lot can do. It is a very powerful force that simply will not be denied in the end. A positive seed will always yield a positive crop. You just don't get to choose when the harvest is. Just know that you will have your day and you will be a better person for it.

Don't get caught looking at the moment as the final result of the journey. Sometimes the rocky road with the pot holes turns out to be the road that led to the ultimate success.

Chico Escuela posted:

Ryno, I don't think we disagree...

Can you imagine having a conversation with your son in which you acknowledge there really seems to be nothing else he can do, and then talk with him about the fact life isn't fair and that while his coach may be wrong, he's still the coach?  Yeah, almost all conversations are going to boil down to "you have to work harder and try to change your coach's mind."  But I think there are times when you have to say "No matter how hard you work, you may not change this coach's mind.  That's not fair.  But you have to do the best you can and think about what you *can* accomplish, not what you can't.

I do think some folks here come awfully close to saying HS coaches all are good, honest folks trying to do what's right.  Most HS coaches surely are; I hope *almost* all of them are.  And I get that folks feel the need to defend coaches against parents' natural inclinations to defend their kids and attack their kids' coaches.  I'm just concerned that we not reflexively make kids think the problem is always that they aren't doing enough--that's no healthier than teaching them it's never their fault.

I agree, there's a good lesson in this message too.  Anytime one's fate is up to another individual, sometimes doing all you can do isn't enough to get what you're looking for.  Learning how to grow through these situations is huge.

Parents want to win at all costs as long as their kid is playing.  Has any parent ever gone up to a coach and suggest he take his son out of the lineup so they can make a run for the title?  I had a parent talk to me about his son's mental illness for almost an hour.  It didn't help nor hurt his playing time, but it did make me think twice about cutting him (I'm afraid he might end up cutting me, literally). 

 

A parent who convinces their son it’s the coach’s fault is just training him for following a family legacy. I’ll bet you can find that parent at the water cooler blaming his boss for the promotion he didn’t get. He can be proud knowing someday his son too, will be a complainer at the water cooler. 

Coach_May posted:

 The same coach who in one person's eyes is the end all to be all is a total failure in another person's eyes. If your son is playing and doing well the coach is all good. If your son is not playing the coach is a clown. Does that happen? Of course it does.

Hit nail on head!  I have seen this play out so many times over the years.  

RJM posted:

A parent who convinces their son it’s the coach’s fault is just training him for following a family legacy. I’ll bet you can find that parent at the water cooler blaming his boss for the promotion he didn’t get. He can be proud knowing someday his son too, will be a complainer at the water cooler. 

Whether it started with fakery or not (I'm agnostic on that), this has been an interesting, and helpful, thread for me.  It's always good to be reminded of some things, especially at the start of a new HS season.  I'm new(ish) here, but really have come to appreciate this site--and a level of civility here that is mighty rare on the Internet.

One last try on this topic:  I think I agree 99+% with RJM and other posters, but with a reservation. You may say I'm splitting hairs or obsessing (and believe me, you wouldn't be the first to tell me so ).

Sometimes I think a kid needs a parent to acknowledge that the kid is being treated unfairly, and not just told to work harder. Not often--maybe rarely--but sometimes.  One example that comes to mind is dealing with prejudice. My daughter had a teacher who had a reputation for favoring boys over girls. I say this as someone who also had a son go through this teacher's class and who has heard the same verdict from other parents who had kids of both genders in this class in other years. My daughter makes honey badgers look timid by comparison and she worked like heck to earn the grade she ultimately made in that class. I never suggested she had any excuse to do otherwise, never complained to the teacher or the administration. But I did acknowledge to my kid that her teacher seemed to have a problem and that I thought my daughter was right to feel she was being treated unjustly. (I won't go into details, but I'm a teacher and I don't make this accusation lightly.)

Granted, a coach's decision to bench a baseball player is different in a lot of ways, and all of us ought to be miiiiighty careful before we assume anything about a coach other than the best intentions and honest motives.  I guess the tl;dr version is: Sometimes I think the message ought to be "yes, that is unfair and it's ok to think so; but you still have to do and act your best," not just "your coach/teacher/boss gets to make the rules, so suck it up and try harder." 

Chico Escuela posted:
RJM posted:

A parent who convinces their son it’s the coach’s fault is just training him for following a family legacy. I’ll bet you can find that parent at the water cooler blaming his boss for the promotion he didn’t get. He can be proud knowing someday his son too, will be a complainer at the water cooler. 

Whether it started with fakery or not (I'm agnostic on that), this has been an interesting, and helpful, thread for me.  It's always good to be reminded of some things, especially at the start of a new HS season.  I'm new(ish) here, but really have come to appreciate this site--and a level of civility here that is mighty rare on the Internet.

One last try on this topic:  I think I agree 99+% with RJM and other posters, but with a reservation. You may say I'm splitting hairs or obsessing (and believe me, you wouldn't be the first to tell me so ).

Sometimes I think a kid needs a parent to acknowledge that the kid is being treated unfairly, and not just told to work harder. Not often--maybe rarely--but sometimes.  One example that comes to mind is dealing with prejudice. My daughter had a teacher who had a reputation for favoring boys over girls. I say this as someone who also had a son go through this teacher's class and who has heard the same verdict from other parents who had kids of both genders in this class in other years. My daughter makes honey badgers look timid by comparison and she worked like heck to earn the grade she ultimately made in that class. I never suggested she had any excuse to do otherwise, never complained to the teacher or the administration. But I did acknowledge to my kid that her teacher seemed to have a problem and that I thought my daughter was right to feel she was being treated unjustly. (I won't go into details, but I'm a teacher and I don't make this accusation lightly.)

Granted, a coach's decision to bench a baseball player is different in a lot of ways, and all of us ought to be miiiiighty careful before we assume anything about a coach other than the best intentions and honest motives.  I guess the tl;dr version is: Sometimes I think the message ought to be "yes, that is unfair and it's ok to think so; but you still have to do and act your best," not just "your coach/teacher/boss gets to make the rules, so suck it up and try harder." 

I’ve forgotten how many times I’ve been screwed or my kids (29 and 25) have been screwed. Sometimes these threads bring back the memory. But I had forgotten for a reason. In the moment I decided, or convinced my kids “This is not going to get in the way. There is a go around I need to find.” After the fact  I’ve forgotten about these situations because I don’t dwell on the negative. I celebrate where I am now. 

Back when I was at a President’s Club the hired keynote speaker said, “It doesn’t matter where you’ve been if you’re happy where you are.” When I do look back I don’t dwell on who held me back. I congratulate myself for fighting through to the other side.

I’ve taught my kids to do the same. If anyone thinks competitive sports can be rough, jump into the politics in the corporate world. There’s always a solution in the long term. But you don’t get there focusing on the negatives. 

Leaders don’t come from the whiners circle at the water cooler. Leaders come from those who walk away from those at the water cooler, sit in their office and come up with solutions to the problems. In a simpler world, sports, the same philosophy applies. 

Very good post. But then I think about all the times I didn't get what I probably deserved. My kids didn't get what they probably deserved. I think about all the good things I have been given. All the good opportunities I was afforded. And I'm simply too busy counting my blessings to have time to think about negative stuff. 

I also have lived long enough to have seen what I believed was a curse turn out to be a blessing. And what I believed was a great break turn into a freaking nightmare. I don't believe we can judge an outcome before the final results are in. 

You can't pick a Rose without navigating the thorns. I say embrace the thorns of life. Sometimes they end up being the Rose.

If everything was perfect for someone then do they ever truly value when they are successful?  Winning is not easy.  Getting that promotion is not easy.  Getting that job is not easy.  So when you have those things you need to appreciate the hard work, mental toughness and value that you get from success.  

I was a head coach for 9 years in Kentucky.  Decided to step way from being a head coach and make a major move in my life to relocate to NC where I did NOT know a single soul.  The plan was to be away from being a head coach for 1 or 2 years.  Ended up being 9 years for various reasons with one being a challenge created by other people.  Now that I am back in the big seat I am having the time of my life.  It has been so much fun and I think that has infected my guys because we are having fun out there.  I can appreciate being a head coach so much more now than i did before.  

I'm happy for you Coach. Having read your posts for several years there is no doubt in my mind you are the kind of guy we need doing this. Like you I stepped away for a few years. My last year coaching was 2008 in HS. I can honestly say I am enjoying it this time around more than I ever have. I am having more fun and enjoying every moment with the guys. As you know there is so much more to this thing than what people tend to worry about. The relationships that are built. The mentoring and the experiences that have nothing to do with actually playing the games. I wish you all the best and I know your players are lucky to have a coach like you.

Thanks coach and all the best to you as well.  Talk about timing our two schools played last year in the 2nd round of the playoffs yet neither of us were there to coach.  Hopefully, we can cross paths sometime soon and meet in person.  I guess we are proving the old saying youth is wasted on the young LOL

Update: Take it how you guys want. My son finished HS JV with over .400 avg highest on the team, 50 AB and DH in the 8 and 2 hole and was awarded MVP for all of his offensive efforts. He played 6 total innings of defense in 16 games. His end of the year meeting was positive with one constructive criticism. He was told that he did not play Varsity and that he will not make it to the next level because of his throwing motion. 6 boys from JV and 1 boy from our freshman team were called up to Varsity to play the last 4 games of the season and to play in the playoffs, we made it to round 2. My son and I watch from the bleachers, he was not called up. He made a .500 team for summer ball with a good organization and college coach. He was lead off and starting CF, he made 3 amazing throws home to stop a runner or gun them out. My son was 14 and played up on a 15U team and the team played up in 16U wood bat PG tournaments. He was looked up to as a leader by the players and coach, which surprised him, he humbly told them I'm only 14 and a JV player.  My son had a great wood bat season batting just under .400 avg. He lead the team in avg, and hits and was in the top three for OBP, steals, and others according to PG Diamond Kast. He made 4 All Tournament teams at PG. He had right at 90 AB. He also pitched and was throwing 78-82 mph which was a personal record for him. He had a blast this summer with his travel coach and team and I hope he can continue that with his HS career. He is currently taking the fall off to workout and work on that throwing motion that is killing his HS career.

HS Tryout update. My son made good improvements in the off season. He is faster and stronger and increased his exit velo and throwing velo. He was put on the JV team again. I am sure he will have another great season, he has put in the extra work as always. Found out yesterday that the coach does not want the players swinging wood bats at all because they are not in the majors and he also said that their summer PG stats don't matter. SMH

BBDAD98 posted:

 Found out yesterday that the coach does not want the players swinging wood bats at all because they are not in the majors and he also said that their summer PG stats don't matter. SMH

Don't want to rehash the whole V/JV debate, but I don't think any HS coach cares about Summer PG stats.  I happen to agree with the coach on the wood bat things.  Very few HS players really know how to swing a wood bat.  Composite bats are way more forgiving of swing glitches.  

The coach didn't say they don't matter to him, he said that they did not matter. He might have meant to say not to him. I can give him the benefit of doubt. Question if you had 9 of your HS players in PG wood bat tournaments over the summer across 3 teams and they played the same age and same weeks and you told them you would follow them. Would it matter then? Would it matter that you had players doing very well, some average and some doing poorly? Would it matter that you get to see how your hitters and pitchers do against better competition if you plan to go deep into the HS playoffs and you know already that you have the weakest schedule? You already know the HS region comp stinks until you reach playoffs. If none of that matters then fine it is whoever's opinion. The wood bat helps the BBCOR bat swing. The wood bat is less forgiving therefore if you can hit with wood you will hit with the BBCOR and since the BBCOR is more forgiving you should get even more hits. My son adjusted very well moving to all wood bat tournaments because it was something he practiced since he was 12. But again you can disagree. I am just trying to prepare my son for the next level. Side note my son did fix his weird throwing motion in the off season. He use to throw on a line and on target but he was putting extra stress on his shoulder. Now he throws faster 85 from 72 but with a decrease in accuracy. Which should improve with practice. 

BBDAD98 posted:

The coach didn't say they don't matter to him, he said that they did not matter. He might have meant to say not to him. I can give him the benefit of doubt. Question if you had 9 of your HS players in PG wood bat tournaments over the summer across 3 teams and they played the same age and same weeks and you told them you would follow them. Would it matter then? Would it matter that you had players doing very well, some average and some doing poorly? Would it matter that you get to see how your hitters and pitchers do against better competition if you plan to go deep into the HS playoffs and you know already that you have the weakest schedule? You already know the HS region comp stinks until you reach playoffs. If none of that matters then fine it is whoever's opinion. The wood bat helps the BBCOR bat swing. The wood bat is less forgiving therefore if you can hit with wood you will hit with the BBCOR and since the BBCOR is more forgiving you should get even more hits. My son adjusted very well moving to all wood bat tournaments because it was something he practiced since he was 12. But again you can disagree. I am just trying to prepare my son for the next level. Side note my son did fix his weird throwing motion in the off season. He use to throw on a line and on target but he was putting extra stress on his shoulder. Now he throws faster 85 from 72 but with a decrease in accuracy. Which should improve with practice. 

Again, I am not getting into your specific situation.  I'm talking more in generalities.  

If you're talking about baseball stats.  Batting Average, ERA, etc, he is correct they don't matter.  What matters to the colleges are measurable.  Things like Batted Ball Exit Velo,  Position throwing velocity, 40 yard speed, and then the eye test (do they play like the coach would like them to play).  

I want to agree with you in general. If you have 9 players as an example and you know their measurables from HS and PG you can see how they use what they have. Hitting an 88 mph fastball for a line drive base hit is different from hitting 88 mph off a tee. An 88 mph ground ball to 3rd off of a pitcher helps no one. Throwing 88 on the mound and can't find the strikezone is bad in PG and HS. I feel overall the statement was better left unsaid. The players who did well were told it did not matter and the players that were struggling at PG were told its ok stats don't matter. How about motivating both.

I would love to know how the PG Stats even came up unless someone was trying to tell a coach what they were.  I would agree if you were telling me your son's PG stats I would say I don't care what they were.  I care about what he does for me right now.  I know kids that have good summer stats but can't hit the slower pitching of HS so they don't get to play much.  I also know kids who have great summer stats playing lower level ball but can't hit fast pitching so they struggle.  Summer stats only matter in the summer and spring stats only matter in the spring and then all stats matter if they are equal and are validated by your ability to play the game.  I also don't care what your summer coach says.   Or if I'm your summer coach I normally don't care what your HS coach says.  When you are with me, it is my way.  I hope no dad or player would try to tell their HS coach about their summer stats but I'm sure it happens.

On wood bat, I think if you can hit with wood bat then it makes you a better hitter but if you struggle with it in practice then put it up.  I would only let a kid hit in HS games with a wood bat if he was dropping bombs regularly or batting over .500.  I would never let a player hit in a game with a wood bat unless he is the stud and there are few of those.   Why would you want to?  Is that what he is talking about or hitting in cage?  Cage, I'm ok with but in games, no way.

Congratulations to your son on fixing his weird throwing motion.  All those posts from you last year (earlier in this thread) bashing this coach ...  sounds like the coach was right last year after all, playing him mostly at DH... might have saved his career.   In hindsight, sounds like his actions were pretty good motivation for your son to fix it.  Have you or your son thanked him for that?

(I'm taking the over on three more pages)

A couple things?  1) How did the coach know to say "PG summer stats don't matter"?  Please don't tell me that your son told him.   2) You're not seriously advocating that your son would use wood in a HS season over BBCOR?    My son hit very, very good with wood....probably as good as he did with metal as far as average and power over 3 seasons of top level summer ball....but he would NEVER have considered using it in a game situation.  Sure, balls that are hit well are pretty close to equal, but balls that are mishit with BBCOR can still in some cases end up getting thru....balls that are mishit with wood are ground outs.   I guess I can understand your frustration with the HS coach, but your arguments so far (PG stats, etc, etc) aren't proving why he is wrong...just proving that you are way too into stats.   If your son is looking to play in college....I would start now....and wipe every stat you know about him out of your head.  College coach's don't care....AT ALL.    You could hit .750 in HS....but if you hit nothing but hard ground balls that get thru the hole between 1st and 2nd you're not getting a sniff from a college coach.   Again, your HS coach may be wrong....but trying to use meaningless stats to prove your point is only digging a deeper hole for your son to dig out of if he wants to play varsity

I too find it odd that PG Stats came up in a conversation.  Did you, as a dad, go up to make sure that this ignorant coach knew how good your son was?  Did your son go up and say to the coach that he had a great summer and the number prove that he is better than the rest of the guys?  Personally, I love for my hitters to hit with wood as much as they can but in a game, no way.  There are advantages to the wood in that, imo, they can make the swing mechanics better.  There are advantages to these other bats and those advantages outweigh the wood bat in HS games.   This is an interesting thread!

Finally, any negative conversations with you son about how you dislike this coach will not help your son.  In fact, they just might be a reason why he isn't getting that shot at V that you want.  

The reason I think the PG stats were brought up by the coach is I overheard a player bragging on another player for throwing 88 while catching. Someone or all didn't believe it so the player that was telling the stats said that they could look it up on PG. Now I also know that at the end of the season the HS coach asked me where my son was going to play for the summer and my answer was with 2 of his other players on team X. He said good that he would follow them all and planned on even coming to some games at PG. The coach also has a travel team that plays at PG. I don't think I mislead anyone on the wood bat issue but If I did sorry. The HS coach does not want them to ever swing a wood bat at his practices and that goes for tee work on up. I agree about a wood bat not being used during HS games. My sons throwing motion lol! No I did not thank the coach for that info. I knew that my son threw a little weird and we had tried to address it before. My son was getting the job done, on a line and on target the way he had been coached. I see no benefit in throwing a rainbow over the cut off guys and 3rd base, sorry I don't. I paid someone to help my son with his throwing in the off season. The HS coach spent all last season with him and did not mention it until the end of the year meeting as a reason he was not going to play at the next level. The coach was of little to no help. Joking but not really I looked up the coaches senior PG measurable stats and I have to say they are not great numbers so maybe they really don't matter to him, but for a different reason.   

Add Reply

×
×
×
×